Brazil Gets Title of World’s Number One Killer of Indians and Environmentalists

Over the last 15 years, Brazil has seen the highest number of killings of environmental and land defenders of any country.
“The rights of Indigenous peoples and environmental rights are under attack in Brazil.”

This was the message delivered by a panel of U.N. special rapporteurs on the rights of Indigenous peoples, human rights and the environment.

The group, which included a rapporteur from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, jointly denounced ongoing attacks committed against environmentalists and Indigenous people in Brazil and offered possible solutions.

An official report created by the group and published in part by the U.N. Human Rights Office noted that over the last 15 years, Brazil has seen the highest number of killings of environmental and land defenders of any country, up to an average of about one every week. Indigenous people represented the highest percentage of all victims.

Responding to these findings, the experts emphasized that “Brazil should be strengthening institutional and legal protection for Indigenous peoples, as well as people of African heritage and other communities who depend on their ancestral territory for their material and cultural existence.”

However, the group lamented that instead of fortifying such institutions and legalities, “Brazil is considering weakening those protections.”

Reforms to improve environmental protections and to safeguard Indigenous people were suggested. They recommended additional resources be allocated to the National Indian Foundation, FUNAI, an institution that provides support to Indigenous peoples.

The report also highlighted setbacks in the “protection of Indigenous lands.” The experts cautioned that they were “particularly concerned about future demarcation procedures, as well as about Indigenous lands which have already been demarcated.”

The panel that elaborated on the report included Victoria Tauli Corpuz, an expert in Indigenous human rights, Michel Frost, a specialist in human rights, John Knox, an environmentalist, and Francisco Jose Eguiguren Praeli, another expert in Indigenous rights.

teleSUR

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

A Pipa Dream

Pipa was the first city in Brazil where people used ketchup, chewing gum, and blue ...

Fritz's map of Amazonia, published in 1707 - Samuel Fritz

Tired of Being Denied Territory, Amazon Peoples Are Drawing Their Own Maps

In 1707, a Jesuit missionary from the Czech Republic named Samuel Fritz published one ...

An industrial mining operation in Brazil - Photo: Norsk Hydro ASA

Mining Is Responsible for 10 Percent of Deforestation in the Amazon

Nearly ten percent of all the deforestation occurring in the Brazilian Amazon between 2005 ...

Riachuelo submarine, a name alluding to the Naval Battle of the Riachuelo, considered decisive in the Paraguayan War - Photo: José Dias/PR

Brazil President Not Happy with Biden, Threatens a War Against the US Over the Amazon

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, a close ally of Republican President Donald Trump and one ...

Caboco on a fishing trip - Photo by Maximo Anderson

In a Brazil Where Worst Is Always Coming to Worst, These Men Stand Their Ground

Brazil has made headlines recently for almost entirely negative reasons — whether it is ...

Brazil Ratifies Paris Agreement and Vows to Cut Its Emissions by About 40%

Brazilian President Michel Temer ratified Brazil’s adoption of the Paris Agreement, which sets targets ...

Uncontacted Indigenous community in the Brazilian state of Acre. Image by Gleilson Miranda / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).

Missionaries Barred from Contacting Brazil’s Isolated Indians

Brazil’s highest court has upheld a ban on missionary activity inside reserves that are ...