• Categories
  • Archives

In India, Lula and 100 Businessmen Sell Brazil as Land of Opportunity

Brazilian president Lula and Indian premier Singh Brazilian president Lula and Indian premier Singh

Brazilian president Lula and Indian premier Singh Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva arrived Sunday morning, June 3,  in New Delhi on a three-day state visit intended to strengthen strategic and economic ties between India and Brazil. Both leaders are expected to discuss, among other matters, multilateral trade talks, climate change and UN reforms.

Lula da Silva flew to India from London with around 100 businessmen, ministers and senior officials in what is being termed as the Brazilian President's "most important visit" this year, to underline the growing ties between the two countries.

With India and Brazil making it to the exclusive club of trillion dollar economies, Lula's visit will focus on promoting more business and investment between the two countries. India and Brazil also share a first level role in the WTO Doha Round negotiations.

The launch of a CEOs forum on Monday, comprising 15 top corporate leaders from each side, is the key highlight of Lula's visit to India. The Indian side will be led by steel tycoon Ratan Tata and the Brazilian side by Petrobras boss José Sergio Gabrielli.

Lula will also hold talks with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on a wide array of bilateral, regional and global issues on Monday and interact with the newly launched India-Brazil CEOs forum.

A long list of agreements to boost economic, energy (between India's oil major ONGC Videsh Limited and Petrobras), space, defense and cultural cooperation, including an extradition treaty, are expected to be signed by the two leaders.

Singh is also likely to seek Brazil's support, an influential member of the 45-nation Nuclear Suppliers Group, for global civil nuclear cooperation.

During Manmohan Singh's visit to Brasilia in September last year, Lula had acknowledged India's growing need for energy, but indicated that his country will take a stand in the NSG only after India and the US finalize a bilateral civil nuclear agreement.

Brazil's emergence as an agricultural superpower and its status as the world leader in ethanol, a byproduct of sugarcane, is added attraction for India to deepen its multi-faceted ties with this Latin American powerhouse.

Quadrupling bilateral trade to US$ 10 billion by 2010 and promoting Brazilian investment in India's expanding infrastructure are focus areas of Lula's economic diplomacy in India.

Lula will also meet President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, Sonia Gandhi, chairperson of the ruling coalition, External Affairs Minister Pranab Mukherjee and Leader of Opposition L.K. Advani, and discuss with them a range of bilateral and global issues.

The Brazilian president will address top business leaders of India at an interactive function Monday afternoon where he is expected to pitch Brazil as the land of opportunity for Indian business and seek more Indian participation in the burgeoning IT sector in his country.

Brazil and India are identified as belonging to the so called BRIC group, (Brazil, India, Russia and China) whose economies are rapidly developing and by the year 2050 are forecasted to eclipse most of the current richest countries of the world.

Mercopress

Tags:

  • Show Comments (13)

  • João da Silva

    [quote]I hope to have traveled to a few more places on earth before I die (knock on wood that won’t be soon). Most my travel was gained courtesy the opportunity in the U.S. military. [/quote]

    Ah, if it is through the military, it must have been to Europe or the far East.Sure you have plenty of time to travel to other places,inclduing India. In fact I have seen plenty of Americans in India,espcially in the city of Bangalore.Bangalore is considered to be the high tech capital of the country and the climate is more amenable and they have some American companies set up there. I am told that it is the fastest growing city in Asia.

    Yes indeed, Bombay is a huge and bustling. Thanks for the video and I could see some of the places I have visited there! Especially, the Gateway of India, which I was told was built during the British colonization. The Indians I met there confirmed what you read in “Maximum City” and it appears the infrastructure is falling into pieces and many multinationals prefer to set up their operations in other cities inland.One thing that impressed me was that the Indians opted to expand the Railway network that was built by the Brits ,instead of knocking it down and building highways.

    The city of SÀƒ£o Paulo does not have even have half the problems that Bombay has,though the comparison you made between those cities and New York city are somewhat correct. S.Paulo has enough horizontal space to expand. Sadly, the high unemployment and crime rates are forcing the “Paulistanos” to move away from the city. The city and the state of S.Paulo are rich enough to revive the city and I guess there again, I blame it on the inept leadership that lacks vision.

    I think that Brazil should indeed develop the cities in the interior to create jobs for the people and to discourage them from moving into already crowded ones like S.Paulo,Rio, etc; Expand the Airports in the interior to recive international flights and build more Sea Ports and make use of our long coast line to transport both passengers and cargo.With serious leadership and good planning, the country could be turned into a truly “Land Of Opportunities” for ALL.

  • Santhanam R.

    Holistic approach to life, economy and environment
    06 June 2007

    Hello Brazilians!

    your comments are interesting. Yes t the Indian economy is growing with some pain. The pain is the laggard agriculture which supports almost 50% of India’s population – 600 million people! We have followed modern agriculture which has ensured that we dont have to beg for food. However that has caused a lot of problems to the environment. Weall need to understand the Triple Bottom Line approach – Economics, environment and social equity.

    Thousands of farmers have committed suicides since their crops failed or they could noy back the debts.Cotton is one of such crops, especially Mahaarshtra state, industrially most advanced, but here farmers cultivating cotton which oncne helped start the textile industries in western part of India which is mostly cultivated under rain fed conditions as dryland crop with poor yields.

    The recent FAO conclave established that only organic farming can help the world’s poor to atain food security and nutritional intake. http://www.fao.org/organicag/ofs/index_en.htm
    http://www.fao.org/organicag/ofs/docs_en.htm

    Let us hope that Brazil and India also follow this route so that poor in both countries are able to attain self sufficiency in food produced organically without spiling the environment. Please read my article in this regard on the holistic approach:http://www.wesnetindia.org/fileadmin/newsletter_pdf/Aug06/Waste_Management.pdf
    Effective Management of Solid and Liquid Waste (From Santhanam R.)
    Paper abstract:
    Waste management needs to be holistic and must adopt an approach that is closer to nature to bring about multi fold benefits. Waste management techniques need to be revisited and modified to suit present dayˢ۪s complexities to avoid entry of toxic wastes into the environment, which are being increasingly produced at homes and other establishments. Treatment of waste generated at household, farms and other biological waste generating sources must include segregation, methanation and stabilisation along with the use of bio-sanitisers to treat waste in a holistic manner.

    We also have another technology which can help convert rice and wheat straws into paper and ethanol. Please read my Blog:
    http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/006806.html

    Adios!

  • e harmony

    [quote]written by JoÀƒ£o da Silva, 2007-06-05 17:34:39

    I watched the video clipping. I was made aware of the fact that the water supply systems in many of the large cities in India are highly unreliable and it was not safe to drink water off the fawcetts,even before traveling to that country. We were warned to drink only bottled water.We didnt have much problems with water (I think it is “Pani” in their language”) nor their food. [b]But I must confess that our Beer is much better than theirs![/b] [/quote]

    Haha! 🙂

    It’s pretty awesome you have been able to visit India and her biggest city. India is today the largest democracy on earth! So, you have been able to visit a place that has recently been able to mark itself in new historical terms. I don’t doubt you are probably more well traveled than I am. I hope to have traveled to a few more places on earth before I die (knock on wood that won’t be soon). Most my travel was gained courtesy the opportunity in the U.S. military.

    Bombay (Mumbai) seems like a fascinating city from what I have read of it and from what video or pictures I see of it. A very [b]huge[/b] and bustling city. Sao Paulo seems kind of like that from the impression I get at a distance (never been there), except Sao Paulo seems older in industrialization and consequently architecture of skyscrapers et cetera. According to the book “Maximum City” most people in Bombay or coming to Bombay from rural India view Bombay as the city of hope, action, and financial fortune in the same way people of the United States viewed New York several decades ago. According to the book most of the poor people living in slums of Bombay, in the more struggling parts of the slums with no water, electricity, or toilets in their shack, view Bombay as offering as much hope and mobility – and entertainment – as New York City (at least this is the impression given). From this site it does not seem, by impression given on here, that many people in Sao Paulo feel the same way (even if they have a house or condo with running water and et cetera).

    Sao Paulo could use a “face-lift” though, on many of its skyscrapers (e.g. blow some down and build some newer and more attractive looking ones).

    2 minute video showing a more hip & cosmopolitan side of Bombay (Mumbai).
    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwpnQ9XwwdY&mode=related&search=[/url]

  • João da Silva

    [quote]Here’s a video posted on Youtube regarding the water issues in the poor sections of Bombay (Mumbai).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGNJuBxCcoU&mode=related&search=
    [/quote]

    I watched the video clipping. I was made aware of the fact that the water supply systems in many of the large cities in India are highly unreliable and it was not safe to drink water off the fawcetts,even before traveling to that country. We were warned to drink only bottled water.We didnt have much problems with water (I think it is “Pani” in their language”) nor their food. But I must confess that our Beer is much better than theirs!

  • e harmony

    Here’s a video posted on Youtube regarding the water issues in the poor sections of Bombay (Mumbai).

    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGNJuBxCcoU&mode=related&search=[/url]

  • João da Silva

    TO: E Harmony
    Harmony, I hardley know about the culture,caste sysetem or other short comings of the Indian society. I did come across here in Brazil a couple of Indians who presented me with books about Indus Valley Civilization (in English and very hard to read for a Brazilian ,because of the rich prose) and the colonization of the Brits (East India Company,etc,etc,).You are in a better situation to evaluate them,because they are in a bigger number in your country. I do not know what caste or class they belong to.

    I have been to India a couple of times including to your favorite place Bombay (!) and Bangalore and Hyderabad. Of course the cities are over populous and congested,but you can still walk on the streets of these cities without the fear of getting robbed or shot at.I was told that Bombay has 0 % unemployment and even those who live in the favelas make enough money to feed themselves. I dont know how far it is true,but we didnt have any problem in India. We also found the food delicious and inexpensive.

    I think there are very few Brazilians I know of that have traveled to India and the ones who did enjoyed the country. I am sure that Lula and SOME of those 100 Barons will bring something from that country!

  • e harmony

    [b]Continued reply to[/b]: JoÀƒ£o da Silva, 2007-06-04 22:36:39

    [quote]
    There are several areas where Brazil and India can cooperate and I just cited Education as one of them. The bilateral commerce can be conducted without the middlemen, as the Indian Executives also speak English and love to pratice their broken Portuguese with us.From my limited experience in dealing with them, I found them willing to give a good deal to us.

    Now coming to LulaÀ‚´s expedition to India with the 100 Barons, it is up to them to decide what to buy from and sell to India.Remember, I am not a member of that expedition.All I hope is the Tax PayersÀ‚´s money is well spent and the quality of life in “Rochinha Favela” in Rio gets much better because of all these treaties signed between Brasil and India. [/quote]

    I’m not against Brazil, the United States, or Germany learning from India or vise versa.

    I think India might learn a few things from Brazil also. While things related to the cast system has improved in India, it still has a much improvement to make in this area. I know you stated you don’t wish to discuss the social, which is fine, but even matters of education are interrelated or tangled up in India’s complex culture and history of casts. One must keep in mind that the Hindu culture, the upper-class casts, tend to wish to ignore the bottom poor segments of their society.

    The link below shows a colored map of the world in relation to literacy. As of 2001 census in India, 65.2% of India’s population was literate. That’s below Brazil’s which has over 80% of it’s population literate. So India can’t be granting greater access to education than Brazil if a higher percentage of Indian society is illiterate. In today’s world a person needs to be “functionally-literate” as well. This is a major problem in Brazil (and India) and it’s also a large problem in the United States.

    Link: [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Literacy_rate_world.PNG[/url]

  • e harmony

    [quote]E Harmony
    written by JoÀƒ£o da Silva, 2007-06-04 22:36:39

    [b]Harmony, my Lad, the objective of my post is not to discuss the social issues and I really dont care to compare the quality of life in the slums of Rio and Bombay.[/b]It was the about the quality of education at accessible cost and how Brazil can benefit from the experience of India.[/quote]

    That’s fine. It’s better to keep it as close to the specific topic as possible anyways. I only brought up quality of life issues because they pertain (or at least should I would think) to the ultimate goal of growing economies and per capita incomes.

    [quote]
    For that matter, I havent heard about the book you mentioned about and I will discuss this book with the Indian gentleman next time I see him and give you a feed back.[/quote]

    I have no idea how well regarded the book is. I found the prose excellent though. I happened upon it in the library, it sparked my interest, and so I checked it out and read it.

    [quote]
    India has been growing in the knowledge based economy and the Internet has been playing an important role in education, especially in the rural areas (E-Learning). I have also met some fine software engineers from India and they are very good.btw, it is cheaper to buy software from India than from other countries.In case you dont know there are several Indian Software Engineers in the Silicon Valley.[/quote]

    Yeah I don’t take anything away from the Indians or India. But the story of India’s development into a greater consumer society is often told from one stand point: the “winners.” Those left out the success story are ignored. Consequently a distorted view point of India’s present reality can emerge.

    Most Indians that immigrate to the United States are highly educated and part of the upper-class of Indian society. In contrast most Mexicans that immigrate to the United States are usually not well educated and come from the lower-class of Mexican society. If an American (USA) was to judge the entire socio-economic realities, distribution of wealth and education, of India and Mexico just by his encounters with Indian’s and Mexicans in the U.S., he/she would probably develop the opinion that almost everyone in India was highly educated and that almost no one in Mexico ever goes on to college if in fact they ever complete high school.

    I’m a proponent of higher wages – even for unskilled work. I don’t buy into the idea that countries around the world should compete for industries relocation based upon the lowest cost. The U.S. built it’s famous middle-class by “collective bargaining” (unionization) – primarily in the areas of industrialization. At onetime industrial workers were considered “non-skilled” workers. Most those factory workers did not have college education, they did not read the “classics” in their pass-time but rather the newspapers and comic books, some did not even have high school diplomas. Yet that middle-class in the United States lived a higher material lifestyle than many college educated Indians in India probably in the 1960’s. I say this because I believe, the popular notion that morally speaking, a person only rates “good things in this life” if they go on to post-secondary education, is bullsh*t. Post-secondary education of course can be anything from liberal art to information technology.

    Continue below…

  • João da Silva

    To:ch.c
    [quote]Indian textiles….for example.
    They are very good, almost as good as Chineses.
    [/quote]

    Funny you mentioned about this. We travelled to India a couple of years ago and my wife went crazy with the Quality clothes they manufacture.They even sell clothes tailor made to the Western fashion.Their leather goods are also very good.

  • João da Silva

    E Harmony
    [quote]The material quality of life in say Rochina favela in Rio de Janeiro is above that of the slums in Bombay (Mumbai [spelling?]) it might be worth [/quote]

    Harmony, my Lad, the objective of my post is not to discuss the social issues and I really dont care to compare the quality of life in the slums of Rio and Bombay.It was the about the quality of education at accessible cost and how Brazil can benefit from the experience of India. For that matter, I havent heard about the book you mentioned about and I will discuss this book with the Indian gentleman next time I see him and give you a feed back.

    India has been growing in the knowledge based economy and the Internet has been playing an important role in education, especially in the rural areas (E-Learning). I have also met some fine software engineers from India and they are very good.btw, it is cheaper to buy software from India than from other countries.In case you dont know there are several Indian Software Engineers in the Silicon Valley.

    There are several areas where Brazil and India can cooperate and I just cited Education as one of them. The bilateral commerce can be conducted without the middlemen, as the Indian Executives also speak English and love to pratice their broken Portuguese with us.From my limited experience in dealing with them, I found them willing to give a good deal to us.

    Now coming to LulaÀ‚´s expedition to India with the 100 Barons, it is up to them to decide what to buy from and sell to India.Remember, I am not a member of that expedition.All I hope is the Tax PayersÀ‚´s money is well spent and the quality of life in “Rochinha Favela” in Rio gets much better because of all these treaties signed between Brasil and India.

  • ch.c.

    Ohhhhhh……
    and hopefully Brazil will go to the WTO to complain about India subsidizes on their SUGAR.
    Because India is also an exporter !
    Hopefully you will also do the same on India high import tariffs on foreign foods.
    You did it against developed countries. Why not against others ?
    But hopefully you will reciprocate, of course, and open your doors to Indian textiles….for example.
    They are very good, almost as good as Chineses.

    Will see your double game……as usual !

  • e harmony

    [quote]n India, Lula and 100 Businessmen Sell Brazil as Land of Opportunity
    written by JoÀƒ£o da Silva, 2007-06-04 16:34:39
    It is an interesting article and by coincidence, I met an Indian who is a visiting scholar in the local university during the week end.Quite a bright and cheerful youngster. He was talking about the quality of education in India that is affordable to everyone.He told us that he was born in a poor family and still he could afford to study and get his Ph.D, all based on his merit.He cited the area of Education as one of the fields that the Brazil could learn from India.

    Lets hope that Lula and the 100 Barons bring something good from that country. [/quote]

    That’s not the impression I got from reading [i]Maximum City[/i] a book written by an ethnic East Indian with dual citizenship in India and the United States. The author was also born and raised in India. In the book he describes much of his visit (he moved back to India at the time) to India in the 1990’s. One of the things he state was how poor Indians lack access to education that is open to middle-class and wealthy Indians. It must be noted that most Indians live in the poverty line, but India has such a huge population that the middle-class is sizable in terms of raw numbers, but not in terms of percentage of population. According to the author of the book India has a very serious problem with illiteracy.

    I think it is likely Brazil is further ahead than India in extending a raised quality of life for its [u]overall[/u] citizens except in one major area: [u]violence[/u]. Ironically, India seems to even be ahead of the U.S. in this area. The material quality of life in say Rochina favela in Rio de Janeiro is above that of the slums in Bombay (Mumbai [spelling?]) it might be worth noting.

  • João da Silva

    In India, Lula and 100 Businessmen Sell Brazil as Land of Opportunity
    It is an interesting article and by coincidence, I met an Indian who is a visiting scholar in the local university during the week end.Quite a bright and cheerful youngster. He was talking about the quality of education in India that is affordable to everyone.He told us that he was born in a poor family and still he could afford to study and get his Ph.D, all based on his merit.He cited the area of Education as one of the fields that the Brazil could learn from India.

    Lets hope that Lula and the 100 Barons bring something good from that country.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

World Bank Loans Brazil US$ 7 Bi for Infrastructure and the Poor

Less large loans for the federal government and more small and medium loans for ...

Brazil’s Zero Hunger Czar Takes Stock and Sees a Long Way to Go

Brazil is succeeding in winning the war against hunger and malnutrition. This evaluation was ...

Brazil’s Richest Man Pays US$ 285,000 in Charity Auction for Lula’s Suit

Eike Batista, the wealthiest man in Brazil, paid the equivalent of US$ 285,000 for ...

Boeing Tragedy: Brazil Air Force Goes Looking for Blind Spots

While Waldir Pires, the Brazilian Defense Minister, continues repeating that Brazil’s air space is ...

No Yes-Man Anymore

After 100 years playing a subordinate role to the United States, Brazil, under Lula, ...

Having the Best Man Wasn’t Enough for Brazil to Make the IDB Chief

On Wednesday, July 27, the Board of Governors of the International Development Bank (IDB) ...

Brazil’s Lula Warns that Mercosur Needs to Mature Fast to Achieve Integration

President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, of Brazil, said today that the larger countries ...

Brazil May Miss Export Target Due to Heavy Rains and Low Oil Prices

Brazil may not reach its US$ 202 billion export target for this year due ...

Use of Credit Card in Brazil Grows 20% and Reaches US$ 87.5 Billion

Brazil’s credit card market should have a turnover of US$ 87.5 billion this year, ...

Who’s This Lula?

While exhibiting an impressive gallery of flip-flops without so much as blushing, the PT ...