Brazil: More than Half of Sí£o Paulo Population Buys Pirated Products

    A street reserved for camelôs, street vendors, in Brazil

    A street reserved for camelôs, street vendors, in Brazil Music, film and publishing industries from around the world lose billions of dollars annually due to inadequate legal protection of intellectual property, but the real victims might be struggling artists in developing countries, like Brazil, according to international organizations and government anti-piracy agencies.

    "Piracy is a cross-border, transnational crime, often run by efficient organized crime groups, some of which even have links to terrorist organizations," a UNESCO report says.

    Piracy of intellectual property poses challenges that urgently call for international cooperation between industry, governments and law enforcement agencies, the report says.

    The Brazilian economy loses about US$ 15 billion every year to piracy just in taxes that are not collected by the country's IRS. It's also estimated that every street vendor who sets up his booth with counterfeited material, including electronics, clothes, software, CDs and DVDs, prevents the creation of six formal jobs.

    These numbers were released earlier this year by the FIA (Administration Institute Foundation) the foremost authority in consumer market in Brazil. The data are from their research Ethics – Ethical and Conscientious Consumption.

    The FIA study reveals that 35.2% of Paulistanos (residents of São Paulo city) always buy pirated products. And more than half the population (55.4%) had recently bought some counterfeit article. For 91.7% the main motivation to buy these illegal products is their low price. Among pirated merchandise in Brazil, CDs and DVDs appear in first place.

    Copyright protection stimulates creativity by rewarding artists and safeguarding their cultural environment, according to creative industry representatives.

    "It is also a key tool for creating incentives for investment in the creation and distribution of cultural materials – and thereby promoting cultural diversity," said Neil Turkewitz, executive vice president of the Recording Industry Association of America ( RIAA ).

    But, according to an annual report by the U.S. Trade Representative ( USTR ), rampant counterfeiting and piracy problems continue to plague many regions of the world, including large emerging markets like Brazil, India, Russia and China (also known as BRIC).

    The U.S. State Department cites data that show global losses from piracy of creative works and software reach $30 billion to $35 billion per year.

    Although American cultural products, such as music recordings and movies, are a frequent target, local industries and artists are the primary victims of inadequate law enforcement, industry associations say.

    "These losses are not confined to wealthier economies. They are increasingly undercutting the economic performance of local entrepreneurs in developing economies," said Kamil Idris, director-general of the World Intellectual Property Organization, during the Third Global Congress on Combating Counterfeiting and Piracy in January 2007.

    For example, according to the Motion Picture Association of America, U.S. studios lost US$ 565 million due to copyright piracy in China during 2005. But the Chinese film industry lost more than twice that much, around US$ 1.5 billion during the same period.

    Mexico's long-established, vibrant music industry has been devastated by piracy. The International Intellectual Property Alliance ( IIPA ) estimates that 67 percent of all compact discs ( CDs ) sold in Mexico are believed to be reproduced illegally.

    As a result, Mexican CD sales plunged by 25 percent between 2002 and 2003, employment in the legitimate recording industry has fallen by nearly half since 2000 and the government is losing more than US$ 100 million annually in tax revenue, according to the International Chamber of Commerce.

    India's film industry clustered in Mumbai, known as "Bollywood," is producing more than 1,000 films per year and quickly is winning audiences around the world. But the U.S.-India Business Council estimates Bollywood is losing up to 80% of its revenues to piracy.

    Similar problems are reported by the media and industry associations in Mali, Burma, Vietnam, the Philippines, South Korea, Brazil and many other countries. An IIPA report estimates that in some areas pirated goods take up 100 percent of the market, squeezing out legitimate production entirely.

    The protection of copyrights and other intellectual property is vital to economic growth and global competitiveness, and countries that fail to provide such protection put their own development and global interests at risk, say U.S. and international officials.

    "Because we believe so strongly in the value of intellectual property rights and their ability to strengthen economies, the United States is working aggressively to help countries around the world strengthen rights," U.S. Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez has said.

    The U.S. administration is leading an initiative called STOP – Strategy Targeting Organized Piracy — to help protect intellectual property at home and abroad. It is posting specially trained prosecutors and FBI agents at American Embassies in Asia, Eastern Europe and other regions, and is working with other nations, the private sector and international organizations to promote strong intellectual property laws.

    Several U.S. government agencies, including the U.S. Patent Office, the Copyright Office, the Homeland Security Department, U.S. Trade and Development Agency and the FBI provide a variety of training and technical assistance programs on intellectual property protection for international participants.

    In the increasingly knowledge-based and borderless global economy, the products of the human mind have special social and economic significance and require special care and protection, say U.S. officials and representatives of intellectual property industries. "Encouraging creativity – rewarding the creative, innovative talents on which our world and our future are built – these are the ends which intellectual property serves," WIPO's Idris said.

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    • Show Comments (17)

    • Forrest Allen Brown

      all over brazil
      it is not limited to the beach citys
      i have see them in the country side superman returns was out on the street before it had made it to the big screen here 2 reals for copy

      if they dont have it they will call and see if they can get it for you
      i have even seen them in boats on the amazon sell them at the docks .

      just another way the little people are trying to get by in a land stacked by the goverment to fail

    • bo

      [quote]the culture of theives
      written by u.s.guest, 2007-04-30 01:29:27

      pirated , bootleg cd,s dvd,s are found in poor neighborhoods in the u.s…. the distributors are most often foreign nationals …,cities where illegal aliens are found ,most allways uncover bootleg goods, fraudelent document dealers, and other popular goodies that appeals to this culture of criminals…….
      [/quote]

      Hate to agree with you u.s. guest, but unfortunately you are right. Brazil does have a culture of lawlessness. Laws mean nothing to them, local, state, federal, international, it just doesn’t matter.

    • bo

      I’ve been all over…
      the U.S. and never have I seen someone selling pirated CD’s or DVD’s. FYI E Sodomy, go to any beach in brazil, from the north to the south, and you will see at least 5-10 people carrying a huge backpack on their shoulders filled with pirated CD’s and DVD’s. I don’t think I know one person here in brazil that doesn’t own a pirated DVD or CD. Last Friday I was coming out of a store, the brazilian equivalent of a Home Depot, and there was a guy at the door with his backpack of pirated music and movies. People sell these in plain sight of policemen, including federal policemen. I’ve seen them selling pirated CD’s on the beach and actually go up to a table of an off-duty federal police officer and solicit him……nada. Hate to break your little reality torted bubble E-Sod, but that’s not the way it is in the U.S.

      You really need to travel to brazil for a couple of weeks E Sodomy….. 😀

    • JAY GLENN

      AT LAST A GOOD THREAD
      At last a thread that shows the true nature of this site.

    • u.s.guest

      the culture of theives
      pirated , bootleg cd,s dvd,s are found in poor neighborhoods in the u.s…. the distributors are most often foreign nationals …,cities where illegal aliens are found ,most allways uncover bootleg goods, fraudelent document dealers, and other popular goodies that appeals to this culture of criminals…….

    • Professor

      Forrest
      [quote]man it tastes like s**t ,
      her reply
      turn it around [/quote]
      😉

    • Forrest Allen Brown

      Professor
      man driving through Georgia see a sign that reads
      2 flavored peaches ?
      so he stoped and asked the young woman there what do you mean .
      her reply was
      take bite of this one ,
      so he did !!!!!! well it tastes like a peach ,!!!
      she said turn it around and try another bite .
      he did so !!! well i taste like apple .
      THIS IS GRATE he said what else do you have ???
      well
      peach and apple you had
      pear and orange .
      grape and blue berry
      and we have one that tastes like pussy
      what i got to try that !!!
      so she gave it to him .
      and he took a very big bite out of it . and went nuts and spit it all over the place
      man it tastes like shit ,
      her reply
      turn it around

    • Professor

      Forrest
      A blind carpenter walks into a lumber mill and shouts out, “I am a blind carpenter and I need a job.”

      The foreman walks over to the blind carpenter and says, “If you’re blind, how can you work in a lumber yard?”

      The blind carpenter says, “I can tell any piece of lumber by it’s smell.”

      The foreman says “O.K. I’ll give you a test and if you pass the test, you’ve got a job.”

      The foreman takes the carpenter over to a table and says, “I will put some lumber on a table in front of you and you tell me what it is.”

      The foreman then puts a piece of lumber on the table and says, “Ready!”

      The carpenter bends over and takes a deep sniff moving his head from one side to the other. He says “That’s a number two pine, two by four, eight foot long.”

      The foreman says, “Duh! That’s right, but pine is easy to tell by the smell and I think you guessed the rest. Here’s another piece of lumber for you to identify.”

      The foreman puts a piece of lumber on the table and says, “Ready!”

      The blind carpenter bends over and takes a deep sniff moving his head from one side to the other and says, “This is a tough one, please turn it over so I can smell the other side.”

      The foreman does this and says “Ready!”

      The carpenter takes another deep sniff moving his head from side to side. He then says, “That’s a clear heart red wood, four by four, six foot long.”

      The foreman is amazed and says “That’s right, but I still think you’re just lucky and still guessing. Let me try one more time and if you get it right you got a job.”

      The foreman then goes into the office and asks his secretary to help him stump the blind carpenter by taking off all of her clothes and laying down on the table. She takes off her clothes walks out of the office and lays face down on the table. The foreman says, “Ready!”

      The blind carpenter takes a deep sniff moving his head from side to side. He looks puzzled and takes another sniff and says, “This also is a tough one, please turn it over so I can smell the other side.”

      The foreman gestures with his hand to the secretary, she rolls over, and the foreman says, “Ready!”

      The blind carpenter moves his head from side to side again looking puzzled. He sniffs one more time, looks surprised, and says, “I got it. That’s a shit house door off a tuna boat.”

      He got the job.

    • e harmony

      [quote]written by Ric, 2007-04-28 20:25:26

      He was only describing “almost everyone [HE] know(s)”……he and the crowd he runs with buy bootleg. Not really a role model even without his sex offender history.[/quote]

      You’re an idiot. Bootleg movies are wide spread in U.S. cities. And I never stated I buy or have bought bootleg movies. Attempting to make a personal attack does not alter the fact of these movies popularity by U.S. consumers in – what has to be – every major U.S. city. Bootleg movies are probably almost as prevalent as cocaine in the U.S. – well maybe not that prevalent but not to far behind marijuana.

      Your commentary shows you are very out of touch of what most middle class and poor Americans (USA) are doing. This has nothing to do with my moral credibility, because these things are so wide spread that the knowledge is as commonly know and apparent as the streets having street lights.

    • Professor

      Forrest
      [quote]but how would i ever get the smell off of the fish
      [/quote]
      Brings tears to me one good eye!
      [quote]pleas dont tell my mother i own a boat she thinks i am a paino player in a whore house
      [/quote]
      Its better to have lobsters on your Piano than crabs on your Organ!
      [quote]we have come full circle back to the pussy tax [/quote]
      Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

    • Ric

      He was only describing “almost everyone [HE] know(s)”……he and the crowd he runs with buy bootleg. Not really a role model even without his sex offender history.

    • Forrest Allen Brown

      you mind belongs to some one elese
      i TEND NOT TO BELEIVE E HARMONY
      just spen a few months in Vegas and did not see people with blankets on the grond pushing DVD & CD like here in brazil . and nuch less watching the PM buying them .
      buy a computer in brazil if the store loads in up you will get the copy of what you bought not the real one and it will be assined to the store that sold it to you , along with 25 others
      it falls in line with all the major citys in brazil have the music cops , they collect money from the clubs that play music as to pay it to the country of the people whom made the music

      i would like to see that happen

    • e harmony

      I’m sure half the population within every major city of the United States buys pirated music and or movies. Almost everyone I know buys “bootleg” movies, it’s about as common as pumping f*ckin gas.

    • Ric

      Ahoy Matey
      Can I getcha to look at some stuff just off the boat, Matey? ItÀ‚´s duty free, from over the sea. You buy a CD, get a DVD free. From Barnacle Bill, the Sailor. The stuff that you see was all copied by me, IÀ‚´m Barnacle Bill, the Sailor.

    • Forrest Allen Brown

      next time
      we have come full circle back to the pussy tax

      but how would i ever get the smell off of the fish

      pleas dont tell my mother i own a boat she thinks i am a paino player in a whore house

    • Professor

      Forrest
      [quote]so if it is a idea , a movie and a song the FBI will come down But if it is a 80ft 94 ton boat it does not matter
      thank you uncle sam
      [/quote]
      If you would have turned your boat into a floating whorehouse and payed federal income tax you would still have your boat I bet!

    • Forrest Allen Brown

      were they invited down to stop the crime or just showed up
      so if it is a idea , a movie and a song the FBI will come down But if it is a 80ft 94 ton boat it does not matter
      thank you uncle sam

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