This Brazilian Furniture Maker Uses Only Certified Afforestation Wood

    Furniture sector company Taedda, from the southern Brazilian state of Paraná, has traced the opposite route from most companies: the organization was established as an export company but, just six months after inauguration, has already started considering the domestic market.

    According to the general manager at the company, Roldo Goi, the inversion was due to a market opportunity. "There was already a route open to Europe. But we have now noticed that there is also market here," explained the manager. There was fear that the furniture – made out of solid afforestation wood – would be too expensive for Brazilian customers. "However, we noticed that there is good acceptance."

    The furniture made by Taedda already arrives in France, Spain and Portugal. The company is negotiating with Angola and the United Arab Emirates, and expects that sales may begin in 2007.

    "We currently export four containers of furniture a month. Next year we hope to reach 12," explained Goi. Finally, still next year, Goi wants to start negotiating with buyers in South America. "In five years, we will be exporting 40 containers."

    To the domestic market, in turn, the company closed one year ago sales to hotel and apartment chains. According to the manager, having the national market as a strong consumer is also good for moments in which there is an export crisis, as it is a more vulnerable market.

    The Taedda furniture is made out of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified afforestation wood. The trees uses are from farms owned by the company itself and are between 25 and 35 years old.

    Taedda has been in operation for a year and a half. The largest part of this period, however, was for testing of the pilot factory, in Sengés, in the southern Brazilian state of Paraná, and for acceptance of the products in Europe.

    The strategy worked out so well that the company has ambitious plans. The idea is to build a new factory, five times the size of the current factory, in the neighboring city of Jaguariaiva, making use of the current labor and hiring more people.

    Taedda is a company belonging to Projeção Group, which also has business in the real estate, industrial and communications areas.

    www.grupoprojecao.com.br

    Anba – www.anba.com.br

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