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Brazil Shows Polarization Between Lula and Cardoso Parties

Brazilian historian, Robson Arrais, believes that the results of the just-finished Brazil’s 2004 elections signal a polarization between the PT (Workers’ Party) and the PSDB (Brazilian Social Democratic Party).

The PT is the party from the current Brazilian President, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, while the PSDB is the party to which former President, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, belonged.


“Indeed, what is occurring is an alternation,” the professor commented during an interview, yesterday, on Radiobrás’s NBR TV.


“Those who were in power shifted to the opposition, and those in the opposition assumed power,” he added.


For Arrais, the PT’s accession to the federal government taught the party to seek efficacy through coalitions. “This is not viewed as a crime nowadays. It’s part of politics,” he said.


In his view, the outcome of the mayoral race in São Paulo between the two parties will serve as a showcase for the winner.


“If the surveys are correct, and José Serra becomes mayor of São Paulo, this could even serve as a springboard for him to run for president again,” Arrais observed before the results of the elections were in.


Serra, the PSDB candidate, ended up unseating the incumbent, Marty Suplicy (PT).


Arrais believes that the party with the greatest ability to form coalitions in the Congress and the medium and large cities, especially in the capitals, will be able to get a head start for the elections in 2006.


“What will also differentiate the two parties is their origin. The PT’s origin is more in the working class. The PSDB stemmed from a faction that abandoned the PMDB (Brazilian Democratic Movement Party) in the middle of the ’88 Constituent Assembly; for this reason, its dialogue with the elite is somewhat greater than the PT’s,” he added.


Agência Brasil

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