In 2006, Brazilian foodstuff company Sadia is going to have a new address. The company is transferring to Curitiba, capital city of Brazil’s southern state of Paraná, their administrative center, thus joining the planning, supplies, purchases and engineering areas.

    The move, together with expansion and modernization in the industrial park installed in the state, will demand investments worth US$ 64.5 million.

    The announcement was made last week in Curitiba by the president of the company’s Management Council, Walter Fontana Filho. According to the executive, the investments in the new administrative center and in the industrial area will implicate the opening of 250 work positions. Currently, the company’s headquarters are located in the Lapa neighborhood of the city of São Paulo.

    Sadia is one of the largest companies in the meats sector in the country. Between January and September this year their gross revenue reached US$ 2.6 billion, which meant an increase in 15% in relation to the US$ 2.28 billion registered during the first nine months in 2004.

    The company has an important activity base in the state of Paraná. Of the 13 industrial units spread across the country, five of them are located in the state, in the cities of Ponta Grossa, Paranaguá, Francisco Beltrão, Toledo and Dois Vizinhos.

    The three latter execute halal slaughtering, in other words, their production meets the religious and sanitation demands for consumption in the Muslim countries. Other Sadia units that make the Islamic slaughtering are in Uberlândia, Brasí­lia, Lageado and Concórdia.

    In 2005, the Middle East took the position of Sadia’s greatest client, representing 26% of their exports, which represented revenues of approximately US$ 347 million.

    In second place was Europe, with 24% (US$ 320 million), followed by Eurasia, with 23% (US$ 307 million), Asia, with 15% participation (US$ 200 million) and the Americas, with 12% (US$ 160 million).

    As well as the halal slaughtering, the products exported to the Muslim countries have the Green Stamp, which certifies that the poultry have not been confined and were fed only on vegetable animal feed.

    Omar Nasser works for the Fiep (Federation of Industries of the State of Paraná).

    Anba – www.anba.com.br

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