Lack of Skills Makes 60% of Brazilians Unemployable

    Brazil’s Ministry of Labor says that one of the country’s serious development bottlenecks is the lack of skilled workers. Brazilian companies are turning away people because they cannot perform certain tasks.

    The Ministry says it has data showing that 60% of the people who go through the National Work System (Sine) (a government employment agency) do not get jobs because they have no marketable skills.

    To deal with this problem, Minister of Labor, Luiz Marinho, and the president of the National Industrial Confederation, Armando Monteiro Neto, have signed a contract for the training of unemployed personnel.

    The program will focus on low-income individuals, between the ages of 16 and 24, or over 40, women, households heads and the handicapped.

    The program will train 10,000 workers over a four-year period in the areas of mechanics, maintenance and electricity and electronics. Pilot programs will begin in the states of Acre, Minas Gerais, Pernambuco and Rio Grande do Sul.

    Marinho declared that with the economy growing it is essential to have skilled people. "In a number of areas there are job openings but no one qualified to do the work," he said, adding that the new program will give skills to young workers.

    Monteiro Neto declared that the Brazilian business community is more aware of its responsibilities, not only in jobs, but in social programs and protection of the environment.

    He went on to say that the skilled worker was an important part of that new reality where education, health and social security it also important, along with the problems of discrimination, the handicapped and child labor.

    Nowadays businesses are interested in a broad approach to worker quality of life in the communities where they exercise their activities, he declared.

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    • Show Comments (5)

    • Jill Boone

      The program will focus on low-income individuals, https://ggstreetview.com between the ages of 16 and 24, or over 40, women, households heads and the handicapped.

    • Guest

      Giving people the skills they need etc
      …this is exactly one of the reasons that we (Youth With A Mission – Jovens Com Uma Missão) are working in Rio in a few of the poor communities there (I was working and living in one of the communities that is a part of Complexo do Alemão) and are giving people courses in computing, English, cooking, literacy (“Alphabetization” ;o) etc…because there are schools, but they don’t work….we were working with a 13 year old kid (Léo), teaching him to read and write, as he’d passed the last year in his school….without being able to read or write … a little difficult to understand HOW he did that….many teacher’s just don’t care…which is really sad for me (a teacher) to see and know.

      One of the major difficulties is that to be able to work as a voluntary worker in Complexo and help the residents and people there, I had to go through hell in order to get my visa…I can’t earn any money…so really there is nothing that I can (as an Englishman) take away from Brazil more than I will be giving (through food, accomodation, electricity and water costs etc)….But the government make it so hard for one to help, or is pride going to stand in the way of life and prosperity?

      If the government made it easier for aid workers to help…especially in the North and Northeast, where the need is greatest perhaps Brazil would start to prosper…with everything that Brazil has, it’s hard to understand why it is not prospering so much more.

      Tim
      eflcuritiba@gmail.com

    • Guest

      Lack of skills, how come?
      Yes that pretty much true.
      NOW, consider this:

      Why they have no skills?
      Who are those without skills?
      What skills are we talking about?
      How the come up with the 60% not 59 nor 61?
      What are they doing to give people the skills they need?
      When will they recieve skills instead of cocaine,glue,crack and other nice stuff like that?

      You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to answer the first question.

      They lack skills because there are no decent public schools.
      Schools where kids go to have at least one meal a day?
      Schools where drug dealers close the school at will?
      Schools where the teacher is so underpaid that trading career and become a bum is a matter of survival.
      Where is the money to improve education?
      Let me guess, in the politicians pocket? Is that about right?

      What is the motivation of the teachers? A fast track to MORE misery?

      From another perspective, ask the President of yours how much education he has ?
      What was the grade where he just dropped out?
      Someone pushed the guy to the presidency. Just a puppet.

    • Guest

      If they told you the truth, they would not be able to gain any public support since their proposals are simply shams to attract votes.

      Here is a clue for the above poster. You can always tell when PT ministers are lying: Their lips are moving.

      P.S. This also applies to all other left-wing factions.

    • Guest

      Yesssss….
      but when Lula and other Ministers make their public speeches they say exactly the opposite.

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