Brazil and Latin America, a US$ 74 Billion Regional Trade Power

    Trade among the Latinamerican Integration Association (ALADI) members, which include Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and Central American countries, is forecasted to reach US$ 74 billion this year, 24% higher that in 2004.

    An ALADI report shows that "during the first nine months of 2005 trade among the association members remains steady although at a more modest rate than in 2004, which was a historic year with 37%. Anyhow the trade flow increase in this period is 26.5%, which is significant".

    Trade in 2004 between Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Cuba, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Paraguay, Mexico, Venezuela and Uruguay reached almost US$ 60 billion and 2005 estimates reach US$ 74 billion. This figure does not include Cuba, since information is not forthcoming.

    As to imports the report indicates that growth is also even and with the exception of Paraguay, at relatively high rates with a minimum 16% for Brazil and 62% for Venezuela. Several countries have a significant incidence in the global regional imports growth figure, Argentina leads with 21%; Chile 15%; Mexico 12% and Brazil 11%.

    However while Argentina, Chile and Venezuela show persistent import dynamism, Brazil is decelerating and Mexico remains rather stable. More specifically Mexico expanded steadily during 2004, but in the first seven months of 2005, the imports influx remained stable in the range of US$ 800 million per month".

    Regarding exports, the report indicates a "relatively extended expansion" and with the exception of Paraguay, the rest of ALADI members show strong surge from 7.3% in Uruguay to 53.4% in Peru.

    "Brazil’s incidence represents 37% of total regional sales expansion, followed by Venezuela with 13.6%; Argentina 11.9%; and to a lesser extent Mexico, Colombia and Chile each of them between 7.6% and 9.5%, adds the report.

    Finally in export terms regional trade seems more concentrated than with imports, with Brazil leading with 35%, followed by Argentina with 20.6%, who have become the main suppliers.

    This article appeared originally in Mercopress – www.mercopress.com.

    Tags:

    • Show Comments (0)

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    comment *

    • name *

    • email *

    • website *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    Ads

    You May Also Like

    Brazil’s PT, a Party Without Honor and Without a Cause

    During the first 30 months of the Workers Party (PT) government in Brazil, few ...

    Dilma visits Lula at hospital

    Dilma’s Legacy: Dealing with Lula’s Remnants of Corrupt Aides

    Dilma Rousseff approaches the anniversary of her inauguration as Brazil’s president at the beginning ...

    Lower Interests and Higher Surplus Fuel Brazilian Market Rebound

    Brazilian stocks bounded higher, recovering from a bout of heavy profit taking in recent ...

    Brazil Spends More on Debt than on Health and Education

    The Argentine minister of Education, Science and Technology, Daniel Filmus, says that Latin American ...

    Brazil wants to install condom machines in schools

    Condom Machines Won’t Solve Brazil’s Sex and Pregnancy Woes

    Once again Brazil is offering a simplistic solution for a serious problem plaguing young ...

    Brazil Accepts Paraguay’s Demand and Pays US$ 21 Million a Year for Energy

    Brazil’s President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva went to Montevideo, where he participated in ...

    Israeli drone to fight drug trade in favelas

    Israeli Drone to Police Rio’s Favelas in Cleaning Up Effort Before Olympics

    Starting next month an unmanned "spy" aircraft will overfly the favelas (shantytowns) of Rio ...

    Bovespa, Brazil's stock market

    2011 Not a Good Year for Brazil’s Stocks: 18% Down

    In spite of a slight gain in the last trading day of 2011 the ...

    Revisiting Two Minstrels

    Antônio Carlos Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes: for two generations, their songs have been ...

    Lula and Minister Bet Interest Rates in Brazil Will Fall Soon

    Brazil’s Minister of Development, Industry, and Foreign Trade, Luiz Fernando Furlan, stated his belief ...