President George W. Bush described United States relations with Latin America as "good" and said his administration’s policy is to be "good neighbors and good friends" with the region stressing upon the shared values of democracy.

    Ready to leave for the Americas Summit in Mar del Plata, Argentina, where he will be meeting with 33 leaders from the hemisphere, President Bush held a joint interview with foreign correspondents in the White House.

    "I’m looking forward to the trip which is an opportunity to foster democracy. Democracy is the form of government which can best stand up to the demands of the people", said President Bush who also identified governance and expanded trade as the main objectives of US policy for the coming summit.

    "Politicians come and go, but what doesn’t change is the importance of standing on principle, and working with our friends in Central and South America that agree with the same principles," he said.

    As to the growing anti-US feeling in Latinamerica president Bush was rather pragmatic.

    "One reason why we have summits such as this is to remind people that we want to be good neighbors and good friends; we share a lot of values, common values, but I also understand not everybody agrees with the decisions I’ve made, but that’s not unique to Central or South America" insisted the President.

    "Truth of the matter is there are people who disagree with the decisions I’ve made all over the world. And I understand that, but that’s what happens when you make decisions".

    But what really matters is that the Mar del Plata summit presents "a chance to say to people in the neighborhood we share the values of rule of law, justice, human rights, human dignity, the right for women to participate equally in society. These are very powerful messages."

    Bush downplayed concerns about further "radical" surprises in the hemisphere emphasizing that "the thing that we’re interested in is fair elections, free and fair elections where people have the chance to express themselves at the ballot box. It’s up to the people to decide who they want."

    However he also pointed out that "sometimes we’ve seen different forms of government in our own hemisphere and around the world, where the people don’t decide but rather the elite decides, a handful of people gets to decide the fate of the people. And that, throughout history, has led to resentment and hatreds and turmoil and conflict."

    Furthermore "if we think that people are disrupting the normal course of democracy, unwinding institutions such as the free press, not allowing people to worship freely, we’ll speak up. I insist we’ll speak up, as I hope others do, as well", highlighted the US president in apparent reference to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez.

    As to promoting free trade and the December Hong Kong trade summit in the framework of the Doha round, President Bush said the US message is clear and loud, "let’s have open markets".

    "The United States has an obligation to make sure that we put forth policies that encourage the process to move on, and we’ve done so, particularly on agriculture, which is a very difficult issue for some. And we took a leadership position on that."

    "Trade is so vital particularly when addressing poverty, because grants and loans pale in comparison to the amount of good that can be done as commerce develops at all levels of government, at all levels of society, as a result of trade."

    "I will come and say to the people, the leadership, and whoever is listening down there, that our markets are open, so long as you open your markets. In other words, let’s have open markets."

    President Bush is also scheduled to travel to Brazil for talks with President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva before wrapping up his Latin American tour in Panama, where he is to meet with head of state Martin Torrijos.

    This article appeared originally in Mercopress – www.mercopress.com.

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    • Guest

      David
      We were all shocked by 9 – 11 and we were all looking for somebody to blame, the Irag war resulted from our own insecurities and the brazen work of cowards that are able to get people to blow themselves up for a cause.
      All this rhetoric about democracy seems to be a way to justify the Iraq war and is not doing a very good job. I was not and am not a fan of starting that war, but lets face it, it happened and will continue for a while, we cannot just pull out. The single interest jargon of has beens like Kennedy only demonstrate that the Iraqi conflict is a political club and all of this posturing has nothing to do with our young men dying. their deaths are just more political capital for the Washington groupies and their crying and hair pulling are single interest dramatics that have nothing to do with America’s best interests or making business with central and south America. We are in a conflict, we have to finish it, but it is not the the interest of the political entities to finish it. Dead men are a good political club, but men that are about to die are a better one.

      How does this affect the above subject? Its just part of the political game that places the president on another front in order to draw attention to other quarters. I don’t think that we, (I am an American with Brazilian residence) the American political machine, has any interest in the commerce expressed by President Bush. I hope I am wrong, but if anything really came of the summit in Mar del Plata or in subsequent talks in Brazil, I would be very surprised.

      American political popularity has seen its ups and downs on the world polls and I don’t think we can expect the world to see us in a more favorable light than we see ourselves at any given moment. President Bush is not a Reagan by any means and his decreasing popularity in the USA and subsequently the world is only natural since I believe that we stood there sucking our thumbs in shock over 9 – 11 while he proceeded to righteously guide us down the primrose path to destroy a leader who at least had control of a country, even if it was not by democratic means.

      Commerce and friendship is not on our minds right now. What is on our minds is whether we can suck up the courage to bring the Iraqi conflict to an end with the same energy and determination with which we started it. All else is a sideshow.

    • Guest

      A big reason that Nafta hasn’t helped Mexico more is CHINA. Factories that were once producing products for the US market are being shut down and transferred to China where workers earn only 25% what their Mexican counterparts earn.
      If you want to see the real problem – check out the increasing number of imports from China to Brasil. Don’t forget that Chinese workers are also cheaper than Brasilian workers. I bought a bicycle recently – made in China for HALF what a similar Brasilian bike would have cost.

    • Guest

      A big reason that Nafta hasn’t helped Mexico more is CHINA. Factories that were once producing products for the US market are being shut down and transferred to China where workers earn only 25% what their Mexican counterparts earn.
      If you want to see the real problem – check out the increasing number of imports from China to Brasil. Don’t forget that Chinese workers are also cheaper than Brasilian workers. I bought a bicycle recently – made in China for HALF what a similar Brasilian bike would have cost.

    • Guest

      Summit of the Corrupt Politicians of the
      This is the correct title for these crooks and elites whom favors killing children in the name of democracy in Iraq. Nafta will only favor the U.S.A.. If the maquiladoras in Mexico improved the lifes of the Mexicans, why are they still jumping the border north? The maquiladoras also helped China imports to the U.S.A. with cheap labor from Central America
      s population. Workers in the maquiladoras can’t even afford to purchase what they produce because of the low pay. No to NAFTA, No to Bush!

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