Brazil’s Development Train Is Running Late, Says Minister

    Brazil’s various state-run enterprises have committed themselves to developing educational projects in four areas the government considers strategic priorities: strengthening and expanding public universities (which are tuition-free); expanding technical and professional courses; improving the quality of elementary education; and, eliminating illiteracy and social exclusion.

    According to Minister of Education, Tarso Genro, speaking at a forum on the issue, at the moment, state-run enterprises are involved in some 200 educational projects, but they are not coordinated.


    “We are using this forum (Fórum das Estatais pela Educação) to give direction and control to the work that is being done.”

    An example of what the project can do which was cited by the Minister is the so-called “factory floor” school program that will become operational next year.


    The schools will be located within state-run enterprises where students can be prepared for work in their areas of activities, either in the public or the private sector.

    Genro says the government’s state-run enterprises are willing participants.


    “They can play an important role. They have various types of resources, besides physical facilities. Professional training and literacy projects will be their strong suit,” declared the Minister.

    Genro went on to say that one aspect of the university reform project is to expand polytechnic type institutions around the country.


    “These universities must be linked to regional development needs. A local state-run enterprise meets that requirement and can help the university fit in,” said the Minister.

    Minister José Dirceu, the presidential Chief of Staff, who coordinates the forum, says that Brazil is trying to pay off a debt it has with education.


    The state-run enterprise sector is a powerful, efficient research engine that we can put to work in the education sector, he said. But the development train is running late and we have to bring the future to the present right now, said the minister. “Brazil cannot wait,” he declared.

    Agência Brasil
    Reporter:Paula Medeiros
    Translator: Allen Bennett

    Tags:

    • Show Comments (0)

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    comment *

    • name *

    • email *

    • website *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    Ads

    You May Also Like

    Allende overthrown in Chile

    Brazil, After All, Had Big Role in Overthrowing Chile’s Allende, in 1973

    It was 1971. Then Brazil's dictator, general Emilio Garrastazu Médici and US president Richard ...

    Hugo Chavez greets Dilma Rousseff

    Will Brazilians Elect a Pro-Bolivarian Former Terrorist as President?

    Bearing in mind that the dominant species of our planet consists of blemished human ...

    Brazil’s Carmakers Intent on Taking on the World

    Following the example of other sectors in industry, Brazilian carmakers have started diversifying their ...

    Brazilian Makes History in New York, Winning Marathon in Debut Race

    Brazilian MarÀ­lson Gomes dos Santos, 29, surprised everybody and made history this Sunday, November ...

    Geraldo Naves

    Brasília’s Politician Gets Out of Jail in Time to Choose New Governor

    When Brazil’s federal appellate court (STJ) released the former governor of the Federal District, ...

    Letters

    “America, the Ugly” redux I disagree with Mr. Raymond Mataloni’s letter in your March ...

    Portugal's Prime Minister with Brazilian President Lula

    Brazil Admitted to Exclusive Club of EU’s Strategic Partners

    Brazil and the European Union are going to start on Wednesday, July 4, in ...

    Xingu Indians doing the huka-huka

    Brazilian Indians Fighting to Become Visible and Be Counted

    “The word ‘Indian’ doesn’t mean anything. Indians in Brazil – once called Xavantes, Guaranis, ...

    Brazil in the Mid 1990s

    By Brazzil Magazine In the mid-1990s Brazil had a population of 156 million and ...

    Only 15% of Brazilians Have a Bank Account

    The coordinator of the Economics and Market Commission of the Association and Syndicate of ...