• Categories
  • Archives

Worried with Their Survival Brazilian Indians Blockade Railroad in the Amazon

Amazon tribe blockade railroad in protest against Brazilian mining giant Amazon tribe blockade railroad in protest against Brazilian mining giant

Amazon tribe blockade railroad in protest against Brazilian mining giant Members of Brazil’s Awá tribe have blockaded a railroad owned by Vale mining company in the eastern Amazon. The company has moved to expand the railroad, but the Awá say the expansion will increase the number and size of trains which transport iron ore from the Carajás mine to the port of São Luis – and that this will make it harder for them to hunt for food. 

Carajás is the world’s largest open pit iron ore mine. To transport the iron ore, trains that are over three kilometers in length regularly hurtle through close to Awá territory.

The tribe is calling for a meeting with the company and FUNAI, the Brazilian government’s indigenous affairs department, so that their wishes can be heard and their rights respected.

On Saturday a large group of Awá families occupied a section of the railroad which runs alongside their land.

Amazon tribe blockade railroad in protest against Brazilian mining giant

Following a meeting with Vale representatives, the Awá agreed to suspend the blockade on condition that the company upholds its agreement to mitigate the impacts on the Indians’ forest.

This is the first time that the Awá have blockaded the railroad on their own initiative and reflects their determination to hold Vale to account.

In April 2014, a campaign by human rights organization Survival’s international succeeded in pushing the Brazilian government to evict illegal loggers and settlers who had destroyed over 30% of their central territory.

However, the Awá are still one of the most vulnerable peoples on the planet. Around 100 remain uncontacted and are very vulnerable to diseases brought in by outsiders, to which they have no resistance.

Last year fires, possibly started by loggers, ravaged one Awá territory, home to the largest group of uncontacted members of the tribe.

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Who Is Killing Brazil’s Leaders?

If you do like conspiracy theories and unsolved mysteries, then Brazil is the country ...

RAPIDINHAS

IBAMA, the Brazilian Environmental Protection Agency is promoting what they call "sustainable industrial logging" ...

Why India Is Decades Ahead of Brazil

Besides religiosity, two things distinguish man from the other animals: walking on two legs ...

Brazil Gets UN Accolades for Its Refugee Legislation and Work

Around 3,000 refugees, from 54 different countries, are currently living in Brazil. The country ...

Brazil Refuses to Take Part in Chí¡vez’s “Axis of Good” Proposal

Brazil’s Minister of Foreign Relations, Celso Amorim, declared that the idea presented by the ...

Bacuri, a fruit from the Brazilian Amazon

Bacuri, Abiu, Uxi: You’ll Be Tasting Soon These Brazilian Exotic Fruits

Amazonian fruits have been known for centuries. When the first colonizers arrived in Brazil, ...

US Bush and Brazil Lula meet in New York

At UN, Brazilian President Blasts Rich Nations for Not Sharing Wealth

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva at the opening of the UN General ...

Orides Fontela: A Sketch

The last time I saw her, she regarded the grass and the trees as ...

Shady Business as Usual in Brazil, One Year After Murder of US Missionary

"It hasn’t changed very much. The area was reoccupied by squatters, and the people ...

Coffee tree in Brazil

Brazil’s Coffee Harvest Grows 27%

Brazil's coffee crop this year is going to total 46 million 60-kilogram bags of ...