• Categories
  • Archives

Brazil’s Women Power Movement to Vote and Be Voted

Groups of women from around the country are meeting to encourage female participation in positions of power. The female bloc in the National Congress and the Feminist Study and Advisory Center (Cfemea) have been developing activities to stimulate women to take part in the electoral process and make demands on government officials.

In the 2004 elections there are approximately 295 thousand male candidates, as against slightly more than 80 thousand women, according to data from the Federal Electoral Court (TSE). The majority (51.18%) of the Brazilian electorate is female.

For Federal Deputy Iara Bernardi (PT-SP), even with the quota policy adopted in 1996, the parties do not encourage women to join their candidate lists.


“The quota policy is one of the few steps we succeeded in transforming into law, and it leaves much to be desired in practice. Most parties fail to fulfill the female quota on their candidate lists.”


According to the lawmaker, many parties lose votes because they are unable to complete their lists with male candidates.

A Cfemea study based on TSE (Superior Electoral Court) data for the 2000 elections shows that there were 70,321 female candidates (19.14% of the total) for municipal council positions, and 1.130 women (7.59% of the total) ran for mayor.


In the 2004 municipal elections around the country, 22.14% of the candidates for municipal council posts are women, and 9.43% of the mayoral contenders are female.


For the Cfemea, this increase in female participation is very small and continues to reflect political backwardness and a space dominated by and focused on men.

The Center publishes a newspaper, Fêmea (“Female”), which is sent to all women’s groups. The objective, according to the Cfemea, is to encourage political participation.

The Special Secretariat of Women’s Policies thinks that the government’s pluriannual plans should determine clear goals for female participation.


Members of the Secretariat believe that overcoming gender and race disparities is essential to democratic progress, and they pledged to help and maintain a dialogue with female candidates elected around the country.

Agência Brasil
Reporter: Danielle Gurgel
Translator: David Silberstein

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Little Hope US Will Let Brazil Sell Military Jets to Venezuela

The US State Department thinks Venezuela is on a military spree that is not ...

Brazilians in London Get Five Years in Jail for Printing Fake Passports

Lucas Fernandez Jesus, 26, and Werleson Rodrigo Ferreira de Oliveira, 25, two Brazilians living ...

Brazil Gets a 10-Day Bath of Mediterranean Culture

It is not possible to discuss western culture without mentioning the peoples of the ...

Brazil’s Appeals Court Denies Moral Damages Against Cigarette Maker

The 4th Panel of the Superior Justice Court (STJ), the highest Brazilian appeal court, ...

Dilma and Marina Gather Plans and Papers to Become Brazil’s President

Dilma Rousseff, Lula’s handpicked presidential candidate to October 3 Brazilian elections promised, if elected, ...

High Costs Don’t Deter Brazilians from Traveling

A survey by Brazil’s Ministry of Tourism has found that four out of every ...

Brazil is the world's largest producer of coffee

Brazil Wants to Be the Whole World’s Espresso Shop

Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply forecasts show that by 2014 the world ...

Brazil’s Promise: A PhD Revolution

Quality, not quantity — that’s the motto of a revolution set to take place ...