Let Brazil Have Its Nukes, Says Rice in Moscow

    In and interview with Aleksey Venediktov of Russian radio Ekho Moskvy Radio, U.S. Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice, said that Brazil’s nuclear activies do not worry the United States. According to her, all Brazil wants is to develop nuclear energy for civilian use.

    Rice was in Russia on Wednesday, where she met President Vladimir Putin. She stressed that Brazil and Iran were two different stories since “Iran has been hiding its activities.”


    In April of last year, the U.S. State Department insisted that Brazil should sign an additional protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), so that the Agency would be allowed to inspect Brazilian atomic installations without previous notice.


    The Brazilian government protested saying that the country is already signatory of the Treaty of Tlatelolco and of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).


    While visiting Brazil, in October, then secretary of State Colin Powell said that he wasn’t worried about the misunderstandings between Brazil and the IAEA and he added that Brazil would not be put in the same category as Iran and North Korea.


    From the Russian radio interview:


    QUESTION: It is known that there are countries that either possess nuclear weapons already or have a potential, a great potential for that: India, Brazil, Israel, Pakistan. And maybe neither Russia nor the United States can hold this process. Maybe nonproliferation doesn’t work at all, it’s just impossible.


    SECRETARY RICE: I know that the potential for nuclear weapons development exists in a lot of places. You have named some of them. We and Russia are both parties to the nonproliferation regime, which is a very good thing.


    And I think we are beginning to carry out our obligations under the nonproliferation regime to try to reduce the levels of nuclear weapons that we, the United States and Russia, have.


    I would remind people – it’s sometimes now forgotten – the Moscow Treaty cut American and Russian nuclear weapons quite substantially and we are now carrying that process out through 2012.


    What we must do is to convince others that nuclear weapons are not necessary. I think we are working together rather well in some of these matters.


    I don’t worry, for instance, that Brazil will seek a nuclear weapon; Brazil is seeking civilian nuclear power. In fact, we are probably going to have to find ways for countries to seek civilian nuclear power while making sure that they are not trying to build nuclear weapons.


    QUESTION: Brazil, yes. Iran, no.


    SECRETARY RICE: That’s right. Because Iran has been hiding its activities. The Iranians say they want civilian nuclear power. They say that this is about peaceful uses of nuclear power. But then we learn that there are undeclared activities at the reactor at Natanz.


    We learn that the Iranians have been probably involved in activities with A.Q. Khan, who was carrying out this black market activity. And it does not inspire confidence in the international system about the Iranians.


    On the other hand, countries like South Africa, Brazil – South Africa having actually given up nuclear weapons at one point – there is no reason that they should not have access to civilian nuclear energy.


    Now, one of the problems is that as long as you have enrichment and reprocessing capability, there is the possibility of building nuclear weapons.


    And the President made a proposal at the National Defense University that there would be no reprocessing and enrichment capability, but that countries would have a reliable fuel supply for their civilian nuclear reactors.


    This is in some ways what Russia has done with Iran at Bushehr. So, there are ways to deal with this problem.

    Tags:

    • Show Comments (1)

    • Guest

      When I came to the realization that the original Russian Revolution was not Russian, that it was financed, organized, and led mostly by Jews who were driven by a centuries-old conflict between themselves and the Russian people, I wondered how such an important fact of history had been so effectively covered up. Upon learning fully about the Communist murder of millions of Christians in Russia and Eastern Europe, I asked myself why there were so few movies, dramatic television series or documentaries, novels, books, or magazine articles about it, but endless coverage of the Holocaust.

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    comment *

    • name *

    • email *

    • website *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    Ads

    You May Also Like

    Congonhas, in São Paulo, the busiest Brazilian airport

    Carnaval Brings Back Lines and Delays at Brazil’s Airports

    It happened on November 1st during the All Souls Day celebration and then again ...

    Brazil: Rio’s Sambadrome Is Already Alive with the Carnaval Sounds

    Fireworks explode over the packed parade stadium, samba drums erupt and thousands of dancers ...

    Brazil stock exchange

    Bulls Stampede in Brazilian Market: Stocks Jump 13.42%

    After five days of steep decline the Brazilian market went into extremely high gear, ...

    Brazil to Use World Cup to Promote Brazilian Goods in Germany

    If 2005 was the Year of Brazil in France, 2006 will be Germany’s turn ...

    Digital and Free Internet Coming Soon to Brazilian TV

    High definition image, digital sound, stable signal, interactivity, multiple channels, and the possibility of ...

    Maracanã stadium in Rio

    Brazil Expecting 1.5% GDP Boost from 2014 World Cup

    According to Ilan Goldfajn, chief economist of the Brazilian Itaú Unibanco Holding, Latin America’s ...

    Rio Oil & Gas Conference

    Oil Industries Big Boys Meet in Brazil for the Rio Oil & Gas Conference

    The Brazilian company Hydroclean, from the southeastern state of Minas Gerais, headquartered in the ...

    Joseph Lepore and Jan Paul Paladino

    Prison Time for American Pilots Involved in Boeing Crash Reasserted in Brazil

    Brazil’s Superior Court of Justice (STJ) decided to maintain the sentence of three years ...