Lula with Ahmadinejad Speaking at a press conference in Brazilian capital Brasília the Iranian ambassador to Brazil, Mohsen Shaterzadeh, praised the Brazilian government support for the decision by the president of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, to enrich uranium to 20% beginning today.

    Shaterzadeh declared that the Iranian nuclear program is similar to the Brazilian nuclear program, although there are suspicions in the international community that Iran is secretly working to enrich uranium in order to make bombs for military purposes.

    The ambassador rebuffed that criticism saying: “Countries like Brazil and Iran do not want to use nuclear energy to produce weapons. Nuclear energy in Iran, as in Brazil, is for medical and agricultural objectives. There is a right for nations to use this technology for the well-being of their population.”

    He added that Iran trusts Brazil, “We believe that Brazilian authorities are aware of the situation and position of Iran. Brazil is not a nation that wants to colonize other nations, unlike many other countries that have reacted negatively [to the Iranian decision to enrich its uranium to 20%].”

    The ambassador went on to say that countries led by the United States, such as England, Germany and France, the ones that suspect Iran [wants to produce nuclear weapons] should set an example and change their position.

    “Those who come out so strongly against nuclear weapons should [practice what they preach]: first destroy their own weapons before telling others to do so.”

    The Iranian project of uranium enrichment to 20% is part of plan to buy the product from other countries and does not infringe on international norms, declared the ambassador.

    “Iran will show that the Western countries are lying, they are not sincere. Therefore, even as Iran begins to produce its own uranium at 20%, it is willing to buy and will not disobey any international norm in doing so. What we are doing is in full compliance with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA),” concluded Shaterzadeh.

    IAEA Inspection

    A day after announcing it will enrich uranium to 20%, Iran says it is open to inspection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the official (state-run) news agency, Irna.

    And the Iranian representative at the IAEA, Ali Asghar Soltaniyeh, says that he has presented a detailed report on what Iran is doing so foreign specialists know what is happening. Soltaniyeh goes on to say that Iran wants the material [uranium] for “humanitarian questions,” as it will be used in the treatment of the sick and ill.

    And that, “Iran has given the industrialized nations an opportunity.”  At the same time, the president of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, continues to claim in public that the enemies of Iran are opposed to the nuclear and technological progress of his country.

    Meanwhile, at the United Nations Security Council, Brazil (now a temporary member for a two-year period) has joined China (a permanent, veto-wielding member) in calling for more talks with Iran regarding the nuclear question.

    The United States, France, England, Russia and Germany are for more, harsher sanctions following the latest news from Tehran. At the moment, France presides over the Security Council and has expressed strong opposition to the Iranian nuclear program.

    As a matter of fact, France has joined the United States in leading a movement by the international community to pressure Iran into backing off its plans to enrich uranium to 20% as part of its nuclear program. France and the US have made it clear that if Ahmadinejad insists on the 20% plan they will impose more sanctions on Iran.

    One of the things they can do is halt exports to Iran of gasoline. Although Iran is one of the world’s largest exporters of petroleum, what they export is crude oil; they do not refine it. So they have to import gasoline.

    The ministers of Defense of both France and the United States have recently made similar statements to the effect that, although the dialogue has to continue, the goal is that Iran should not be allowed to produce nuclear weapons. Herve Morin, the French minister of Defense, says that there is no doubt that Iranian nuclear ambitions are in the military area.

    The UN Security Council has already imposed three rounds of sanctions on Iran.

    At the moment, Iran is enriching uranium at 3.5%, but needs to reach 20% to make the fuel viable for running a nuclear reactor that produces isotopes for medical purposes. An atomic bomb uses uranium enriched to 90%.

    ABr

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    • Show Comments (29)

    • Ricardo

      angryamerican is probably some poor redneck with a 120% mortgage he can no longer afford to pay, so just excuse him. I read an article which said Brazil’s relative recent success has gone to Lula’s head, and that’s probably right. It does seem like Lula’s government is trying to elbow his way into the world stage, which in my view is just daydreaming foreign policy. I don’t like it but have to live with it, as the brazilian poor love Lula and his assistencialist programmes. I would love to know though what the anti-Iran brigade think of the assassination of the Hamas man in Dubai… please don’t tell me this is Iran’s fault too. Let’s be honest, Israel’s policy in the Middle East has caused more problems for the region than anything else. The Israel-lobby in Washington is just too powerful to let the americans see that.

    • James from NYC

      [quote]The last time I heard a similar story was in 2002/2003, though about adifferent country with different settings. WMDs aimed at European and American cities, Rape rooms, underground bunkers, etc. Do you remember the name of that country? [/quote]
      So now you are comparing the Iranian opposition and my friends who have loved ones in Iran who convey stories about repression there with Bush and Cheney and their WMD lie?
      [quote]Who said I was angry at the U.S. government? To get angry, I would appreciate your listing all the “misdeeds” they committed in Brazil! [/quote]
      You said that supporting a brutal dictatorship was worth it to irritate the US, I think it was a reasonable inference that you have a lot of animosity towards the US government (or perhaps its people?). I’m not a historian and I’m not Brazilian so I won’t attempt to enumerate for you things that you should well know yourself, and probably already do. I can see that you aren’t interested in a reasoned discussion so you should go back to your pissing contest with AngryAmerican, the pair of you seem to be on the same level.

    • Andrade

      [quote]Andrade, are you really content when you hear of protesters in Iran being beaten, shot, dragged off, raped, disappeared?[/quote]

      The last time I heard a similar story was in 2002/2003, though about adifferent country with different settings. WMDs aimed at European and American cities, Rape rooms, underground bunkers, etc. Do you remember the name of that country?

      [quote]Does your anger at the US government supporting such deeds in Brazil justify Brazil turning a blind eye to them in Iran?[/quote]

      Who said I was angry at the U.S. government? To get angry, I would appreciate your listing all the “misdeeds” they committed in Brazil!

    • James from NYC

      It’s people like AngryAmerican that give this country a bad name. He was however correct to point out the stupidity of supporting ruthless regimes just to piss off the USA. Andrade, are you really content when you hear of protesters in Iran being beaten, shot, dragged off, raped, disappeared? Does your anger at the US government supporting such deeds in Brazil justify Brazil turning a blind eye to them in Iran? Brazilians of all people should be sympathetic to the situation of the Iranian people and stand up for THEIR right not to be beaten by secret police thugs for speaking their minds.

    • Andrade

      [quote]If I am to take your comments seriously, the answer is clearly no[/quote]

      In the coming weeks, you will learn to take my comments seriously. You know why? The politicians all over the world are “farinha do mesmo saco”.

    • Andrade

      [quote]Do you really think Brazil’s support for Iran matters?[/quote]

      No, I don’t think so. On the contrary, you and “hunh” and a few others seem to think that it does matter.Otherwise, you wouldn’t be constantly ranting and raving about the friendly relationship we have with that country.

      [quote]and if you keep messing with America your pisshole little country is going to get burned.[/quote]

      You intend sending Arnie Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone to get this job done? :o;-)

    • angryamerican

      [quote]Yes, it was and still is[/quote]
      Do you really think Brazil’s support for Iran matters? Nobody in the world cares what Brazil thinks. They are just another shithole obsessively jealous of America’s power which they will never have a fraction of. Brazil isn’t even a great power and if you keep messing with America your pisshole little country is going to get burned.;-)

    • hunh?

      Andrade: now you are getting at another important issue: under Obama, the US has been reaching out to Brazil, but it is Brazil that is not taking the opportunity to work together. It seems that this alliance with Iran is simply to promote Brazilian business and to “piss off the US”. What kind of immature politics is that? Has Brazil really arrived as a sensible reasonable world player? If I am to take your comments seriously, the answer is clearly no. And if US/Brazil relations continue to suffer, you should look at such hostile attitudes in your country, leaders and people who are blocking such an alliance.

    • Andrade

      [quote]Hope it was worth supporting a ruthless dictator just to piss america off. [/quote]

      Yes, it was and still is.:-)

    • angryamerican

      Lula is foolish
      Brazil can kiss a being a permanent member of the security council good bye. Hope it was worth supporting a ruthless dictator just to piss america off.

    • James from NYC

      How about supporting the people of Iran?
      If Lula wants to support the people of Iran why doesn’t he say something about the way the Iranian regime he’s cuddling up to treats its citizens who dare to publicly disagree with the government? I admit I don’t know a whole lot about Brazil but it surprises me that such an culturally vibrant country as Brazil would be falling all over itself to make friends with people who do not love freedom to express oneself through art, literature et cetra, things that I take it most Brazilians value quite a lot.

      Given that Iran is such an ancient hub of intellect I can see the attraction, but I think it would be much better if the Brazilian government would be a friend to the people of Iran who love freedom of information and expression instead of encouraging the antics of the current regime. I really hope Lula is doing something good behind the scenes that we don’t see in public because right now I am truly shocked that he would go so far as to speak favorably about this obvious step towards an obviously not peaceful nuclear program.
      Yes, the USA is guilty of supporting numerous brutal regimes, including in Brazil, as I understand it. But is that a good excuse for Brazil to use its new clout to start doing the same thing?

    • hunh?

      Ricardo: just because Brazilians love McDonald’s junk food and they love Hollywood blockbusters like the Terminator, doesn’t convince me they are in love with the US, instead, it just makes me think, sadly, they are willing to take up some of the seemy aspects of our cultures that even many Americans now reject. Personally, I can’t remember how many years it has been since I last went to McDonald’s. But any way, I do acknowledge there are many pro-American Brazilians. i met many and made friends with some while living there. Besides, I don’t expect them to be simply pro-american. I am not always! I am very critical of the US. But I am questioning many of the demonizing attitudes some Brazilians have of the US.

    • hunh?

      Capnamrca: Yes, I fully agree with your post.
      [quote] If Mr. Lula and his administration would go about trying to develop a better relationship with the Obama people, I truly think it could be the best partnership either country has ever had, but the Brazilians seem to think the U.S. is on it’s way to obscurity, and China is going to pull Brazil into the industrial age right along beside them.

      If I were the Brazilian people, I might worry a bit more about my government making close alliances with regimes who tend to lead by force, intimidation, and censure.

      I love the Brazilian people and their resiliency, but their acceptance of everything their government tells them about the outside world is astounding to me. As an example, many people I talk to in Brazil believe the U.S. government has purchased most of the state of Amazonas, and is now flying the U.S. flag. Truth of the matter is, China is the largest foreign investor in Amazonas, and as far as I have been able to find, The U.S. government doesn’t own a square inch of it.[/quote]

      Yes, I agree, many Brazilians have some wild ideas about the US wanting to invade them, etc. THEY are displaying the paranoid attitude, not me.
      Likewise, yes, you are right, I heard similar attitudes praising the relation with China.
      If and when China’s economy surpasses the US in size, I think the Brazilians and the rest of the world will have far more to fear from the foreign policy of China INC., which is not so much as a state for the Chinese people, but a super-charged fascist government organized for the sole purpose of Chinese capitalism. If you think the US has been brutal as a super power (and I join you in being critical of the US in this case) I think the Chinese would make our offenses look like child’s play. Just ask a Tibetan about the brutal nature of Chinese rule in Tibet. So Brazilians would rather suck up to Iranian dictators and a repressive Chinese state than find commonalities with the US? Good luck with that program.

    • hunh?

      By the way, for those who celebrate the current recession in the US, you may consider a more sympathetic attitude since the people bearing the major brunt of this calamity are the lower and working class, which often is unproportionaly represented by other South American immigrants there who cannot find work now. Many of the Brazilian immigrants there returned to Brazil after not being able to find work. So who are you laughing at with such shameful comments?

    • hunh?

      Capnamerca and Adriana A: thanks for your supportive comments. Ricardo: While you make a point that many Brazilians love the US, I think you are not acknowledging the depth of the anti-American sentiment there as well. Yes, South America (including Brazil) and the US should be great allies, cooperating on many projects, and working together like EU nations work together, but we are far from this. After living in Brazil for years, I was very disenchanted with the anti-american attitudes I often encountered. Now mind you, I am deeply critical of US military interventions, imperialistic ventures, and out of control capitalists. Yet, even I found the demonizing tendencies of many Brazilians too much to bear. Much of it was silly stereotypes gleaned from TV novelas, resembling urban legends more than in depth journalism or research on the US. My son was born in Brazil and my wife’s family is there, so I will always have a certain affinity for Brazil, especially for the poor there. Yet, I think this self-serving jinogism I hear so commonly on this site and while in Brazil, makes it difficult for our countries and people to really break through to a better relationship. Certainly, this mis-step by Lula, only sets us back further. Perhaps it will show Americans the depth of the resentment Brazilians have for Americans. Sadly, and ironically, in contrast, most Americans just want the best for Brazil, while Brazilians often take pleasure in the failures of the US. I was particularly repulsed by the various posts here that delighted and celebrated the collapse of the US economy recently. I would find it shameful if Americans did this to Brazil when they were down. It’s hard to gauge the depth of this negativity since as you said, many Brazilians are positive about the US. While I know 9/11 must be understood in the context of past US relations to the Mid East, I also know it was a foul, evil and cowardly act that killed thousands of Americans, and even Brazilians (36?). So I was shocked and repulsed one day when walking the USP campus (Sao Paulo) to see someone selling various shirts with images of the World Trade Towers being destroy and with various insensitive mocking titles: Where is King Kong when you need him? etc. I was also shocked that nobody seemed to see the offense in this. Of course it would be intolerable in the US, but since I don’t have the time or space here to document my experience with anti-americanism, I will just leave you with this one simple anecdotal story. Clearly, if you look closely you will see and hear the resentment. And as I said, if Brazil was offering a higher moral vision of the world, I would excited to champion it, but this is not the case, especially with Lula hugging a tyrant to make a business deal.

    • hunh?

      Ricardo: if you honestly believe that the Iranian government simply wants nuclear technology for energy, you haven’t been reading closely what is well known by most of the world: Iran has an extensive network of tunnels for underground nuclear processing centers. This is not standard practice for energy programs. While Brazil uses nuclear technology for medical and other purposes, you can’t compare the two countries. It is not just the US seeking oil rights in Iran. You are missing the fact that the majority of Iranians are out in the streets protesting against this illegitimate regime. Is Brazil so bent on thumb their nose at the US that they can’t see that regime is a danger to stability in the region and beyond. Clearly, the Europeans who are close to Iran, understand the dangers here. They are spearheading an initiative to impose sanctions (Sarkozy), and it is not about gaining oil rights, but threats to world peace. Here is another consideration: if sanctions and negotiations don’t work, Israel (whether rightly or not) may likely attack the nuclear facilities in Iraq. This would result in a disruption of oil supplies and an embargo from Iran that would drastically raise oil prices. Even Russian and China are considering the simple and practical outcome of this scenario. Yet, Lula seems to want to entertain the charade that nobody else believes: Iran wants nuclear energy. Yeah, a nation rich in oil needs to desperately pursue nuclear energy? Ok, you continue to believe this nonsense, but it seems pretty clear that Lula wants to make some business deal here. Now don’t be surprised if the other nations who are striving to bring Iran are put off by Lula’s deception here. I don’t see the good in his efforts.

    • Capnamerca

      An interesting article, which explains the world’s anxiety with Ahmedinajad
      And no, this is not a U.S> news source.

      http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/profiles/mahmoud-ahmadinejad-the-nuclear-prophet-523025.html

    • Capnamerca

      Ricardo
      The UN security council has never denied Iran the right to build an operate their own nuclear power plants. In fact, they have encouraged it by offering to provide the enriched uranium to do it with.

      What the UN is concerned with is Ahmedinajad’s threats to wipe Israel off of the map. Anyone who doesn’t take this threat seriously is a fool. The Muslim extremists have shown a propensity for suicide missions against the Israelis, and Ahmedinajad wants to be the biggest martyr of them all.

      I personally am not a fan of modern day Israel, or the U.S. government’s alliance with them, but to put Ahmedinajad in a position to launch a nuclear attack is the most foolish proposition facing the earth today.

      A news report from today about preparations for the big anniversary.
      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/10/world/middleeast/10arrests.html?hp

      [quote]Many of the Brazilians who rant against the US are just sour grapes their they are not in a position as the US.[/quote]

      I do see plenty of this attitude in Brazil. I can’t say it’s a majority of the Brazilian’s attitude, but it is strong. Since i have been watching the issue, I cannot remember Lula saying anything positive towards the U.S. Many of the Brazilians seem to feel the U.S. is the devil in red, white, and blue, but I think it works both ways here. If Mr. Lula and his administration would go about trying to develop a better relationship with the Obama people, I truly think it could be the best partnership either country has ever had, but the Brazilians seem to think the U.S. is on it’s way to obscurity, and China is going to pull Brazil into the industrial age right along beside them.

      If I were the Brazilian people, I might worry a bit more about my government making close alliances with regimes who tend to lead by force, intimidation, and censure.

      I love the Brazilian people and their resiliency, but their acceptance of everything their government tells them about the outside world is astounding to me. As an example, many people I talk to in Brazil believe the U.S. government has purchased most of the state of Amazonas, and is now flying the U.S. flag. Truth of the matter is, China is the largest foreign investor in Amazonas, and as far as I have been able to find, The U.S. government doesn’t own a square inch of it.

    • Andrade

      [quote]Mr hunh can stop this rant now, it’s getting out of order.[/quote]

      A nice try, but it hard to stop a paranoiac from ranting.;-)

    • Ricardo

      Mr hunh can stop this rant now, it’s getting out of order. Most brazilians love the US and american culture in general. Just this week Beyonce was singing for thousands in Brazil and most american bands are well known. American films are the most watched too. We love junk food and drive american cars. Our cities aspire to american ones. The only american thing I (would even say ‘we’) don’t like is precisely your foreign policy. I don’t like U$4billion subsides to american cotton farmers either too. Apart from that, I love the US even though I have never been there (living in London at the moment). It’s clear, though, that the US is losing ground in terms of influence in Latin America and that that ground is being occupied by China due to their new money.

    • Ricardo

      This certainty Mr. hunh has of Iran’s intentions to build a nuclear bomb is the same he might have had about the existence of Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, which we now know was a lie. Even though I’m no fan of Mr Lula (and don’t vote for him) I do think is perfectly acceptable for Iran to generate energy by nuclear means, just like Brazil does. We all know the US is thirsty for oil and, coincidentally, Iran is one of the world’s top 3 oil reserves.

    • hunh?

      What I don’t get about some Brazilians on this site is that they are like Lula: willing to bend over backwards to kiss the ass of a dictator who is dishonored as a criminal and a thug in the eyes of his own people.

      [quote]Ambassador Mohsen Shaterzadeh is 100% correct. He should also know that we value our friendship with the people of Persia very much and standby to extend all the help in their hours of need.[/quote]

      Likewise they seem willing to bend over backwards to thumb their nose at the US, during a time when the most pro-democratic multilateral president is in power earnestly willing to cooperate with Brazil and south America for mutual development. yet Lula continues to yelp about alliances with tyrants and other undemocratic nations like China INC. Andrade: you say the Iranians should know you value their friendship. And what of the US friendship with Brazil thousands of Brazilians come to work, vacation and study in the US and yet their is no mention or concern with the US/Brazil friendship. What friendship do you have with Iran? Do thousands of Brazilians work there, vacation there, study there, get rich and live a good life there as they do in the US? I am sick of the angry tirades I hear on this site against the US from Brazilians when in fact many benefit generously from the relation with the US. Try studying in Iran or working there and send your savings home, and then write here about the great friendship you have with Iranians. Many of the Brazilians who rant against the US are just sour grapes their they are not in a position as the US. While I am no apologist for the worst features of US capitalism, Brazilians just hate the US because they want to to usurp us: there is nothing more moral or righteous about their claims. And they harbor and cultivate a bitter resentment spinning a tale of being victims of the US, without acknowledging any of the benefits they have reaped from years of trading as well. They look like a bunch of adolescents having a tantrum: a bunch of ungrateful hypocrites! I have no faith that they would be operating on a higher moral plane than the US. This case illustrates this further. Furthermore, if you want to do what is really in the interest of Iran and not the ruling despots and their corrupt thugs, then speak out against the crimes they are committing against their own people, and decry Lula’s alliance with this brutal regime.

    • Adriana A.,

      Hunh?
      Thanks, for your posts!!!
      That is what I have been trying to write here all along about Lula and his corrupted labor Party (PT). This coming election will be crucial to Brazil -last opportunity to change course (crazy foreign policy) and save democracy. Celso Amorim, our foreign secretary of state is the worst we ever had, he threw our diplomacy in the garbage. I am glad you see that but unfortunately, not a lot Brazilians see it. However, I pray and hope they will realize that in October elections and vote to anyone but Dilma.

    • hunh?

      anti-Brazilian propaganda? Lula made his bed and now he needs to lay all democratically minded people in the world see the brutal illigitimate nature of this regime. The majority of Iranians are vehemently against them, but Lula and Brazil want to be their buddies. Well, I can’t debate the virtues of a democratically socialist government. I have no interest in the undemocratic dishonest characters of the Left like Chavez. I am beginning to realize Lula is more in this camp than aligned with the rest of the democratically minded nations of the world. I am no apologist for the war in Iraq, and the Israeli treatment of the Palestinians. Obama rightfully has the US on the path out of Iraq, hopefully we will soon be out of Afghanistan. You can argue that the war in Afghanistan was justified by the attacks of 9/11 and Iraq was just the hubris of GW Bush and the neo-conservatives. I would argue as vehemently with those nut cases who got us into that scandalous war. But two wrongs don’t make a right. We need to speak out against lies and deception wherever it stands whether it is the US government, Israel, Iran or Brazil. What I see here so often is that Brazilians treat politics like soccer match where you always stand behind your team, and you aim to win over your opponent. The new and future model of world politics will be based on cooperation and joint ventures among nations working toward goals that we all have in common: stability in trade, attacking global warming, fighting world poverty and hunger, assisting each other in times of crisis.

      Lula is just using this as an opportunity to thumb his nose at the US and win points with his constituency, while ignoring what the entire world knows: Iran is pursuing nuclear arms. A nuclear attack from Iran would destabilize the region as well as
      bring chaos to all surrounding regions which is why the Europeans are even more keen to addressing this issue. Iran does not compare to the peaceful uses of nuclear power by Brazil. It is a lie to compare the two. Iran is on the verge of civil war and all the president can do is obsess about nuclear material that is supposedly for medical purposes: his country struggles with so many other basic problems; dozens of secret caves have been built across the country for developing a nuclear arsenal.. And if you don’t see that this government is corrupt and dishonest and bent on war, you have not been paying attention to the news: the president regularly pronounces they will wipe Israel off the map, and that the holocaust did not occur. Clearly a loose cannon and a wacko. And anyone incapable of not seeing clearly has their head in the sand. Sinclair Lewis said: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!” This is obviously the case for Lula and the people who are making business through this.

    • Andrade

      [quote]If Israel were ever to be attacked by Iran, Brazil would need to answer for whatever complicity it has with this regime gaining nuclear weapons.[/quote]

      Son, Iran hasn’t attacked any country in recent times. You cant really say the same for your buddies in Tel Aviv nor for your own governments. Just think about it before coming out with your venomous anti Brasilian propaganda. But there again, what can one expect out of a self confessed “socialist”. Illogical like the rest of your fellow travelers.

    • hunh?

      I am a socialist who once had hopes that Lula would present and alternative political agenda. I learned while living in Brazil how Lula was implicit in political corruption with bags of money exchanged for favors (Mensaloao), and the people reelected with him when they should have been investigating and impeaching him. Now, I see him hugging the president of Iran, and I am absolutely repulsed. Yes, the world knows that the Iranian government is on the road to developing nuclear weapons. There is quite extensive evidence on their research labs buried deep in various tunnels throughout the country. You want to liken them to Brazil? NONSENSE. Brazil is doing no such thing and their nuclear are not nor ever been in question in terms of nuclear arms development, unless this is to signal a new change for Brazil. But it seems more likely a business deal. When the allies were dying in WWII fighting Nazis, Brazil was making deals and doing business with the Nazi’s, which they conveniently like to forget. Seems like more of the same shameless business deal here with Brazil. Yes, this brings Lula and Brazil to a shameful position: supporting a dictator who is now beating its own people for simply protesting a rigged election. February 11 will be a mass demonstration in Iran, and it is likely to be a bloody affair. Brazilians will see the kind of regime they are supporting. Why is is abominable for the US to support the dictatorship of Brazil in the past, yet Lula shamefully hugs and sucks up to this tyrant. He is a war mongering holocaust denying tyrant who is only in power due to the brute force of the secret police and militias in Iran. When this regime falls, it will just leave Lula and Brazil with egg on their face and on the wrong side of history. Yes, the world knows this man for who he is, but Brazil and Lula want to make a deal. Shame on you and any Brazilian who would befriend this illegitimate criminal regime. If Israel were ever to be attacked by Iran, Brazil would need to answer for whatever complicity it has with this regime gaining nuclear weapons. This is Lula’s idea of Brazil taking a greater role in world politics? PATHETIC! Shameful! The world knows about Iran, and if this keeps up, they will learn more about the hypocrisy, deceit, corruption and hubris of Brazil and Lula.

    • Ahab from Boston

      Agreed
      I don’t see the upside in allowing Iran to grandstand in Brazil. While I understand why Brazil agrees with Iran, does the government need to publicly support Iran’s position.

    • Andrade

      [quote]The ambassador rebuffed that criticism saying: “Countries like Brazil and Iran do not want to use nuclear energy to produce weapons. Nuclear energy in Iran, as in Brazil, is for medical and agricultural objectives. There is a right for nations to use this technology for the well-being of their population.”[/quote]

      Ambassador Mohsen Shaterzadeh is 100% correct. He should also know that we value our friendship with the people of Persia very much and standby to extend all the help in their hours of need.

    • James from Philly

      WHY?
      I find it puzzling why Lula continues to support Iran. What does Brazil have to gain? Does brazil do that much business with Iran.

      The world knows what iran is about.. The destruction of Israel.

      For all the good Lula has done for Brasil,, supporting a terrorist country like Iran is a big mistake.

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