Brazilian Representative Wants to Bar Ahmadinejad from Visiting Congress

    Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, president of the Islamic Republic of Ira

    Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, president of the Islamic Republic of Ira The Brazilian Congress is scheduled to receive the official visit of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, president of the Islamic Republic of Iran, this Monday, November 23. The presidents of the Lower House, Michel Temer and of the Senate, José Sarney, will welcome the Iranian leader at 3:45 pm in the Senate's Noble Hall, in Brazilian capital BrasÀ­lia.

    Target of street protests in Brazil in recent weeks, the Iranian leader's visit has also sparked controvery in the National Congress. House representative Rodrigo Rocha Loures, from the PMDB, a party allied to the Lula administration, vows to request the Chamber to deny Ahnadinejad entrance to the floor.

    For Rocha Loures, due to the aggressions against minorities, such as women and Jews, and due to the dictatorial character of the Iranian government, charged with electoral fraud, Brazil should not allow Ahmadinejad to visit the country.

    "It is an inopportune call, it brings a shadow to the Brazilian Congress. I am against him being allowed to pay a visit to the Brazilian peoople's House of democracy, among other reasons because his own re-election is being challenged for suspicion of vice and fraud."

    The congressman also wonders what would be the agendas that bring Brazil and Iran together. "Is there by chance an interest in developing nuclear weapons? Do we need by any chance their oil, when we have the pre-salt? This is a mistake, and, in case this comes to the Floor, I will file a motion to president Michel Temer to not allow it to happen."

    Looking from another perspective representative Maurí­cio Rands, from the ruling Workers Party and member of the Foreign Relations and National Defense committee, says that, in receiving the Iranian government, Brazil is not standing up for Ahmadinejad's attitudes and postures, but only fulfilling an important role as international mediator.

    "It is natural that there are tensions, most especially with our brothers from the Jewish community, who feel attacked by Ahmadinejad. On the other hand, the international community itself has been asking Brazil, through president Lula, that it keep the dialog with Iran's regime going, even to make possible a peaceful solution, that would not involve an armed conflict of unpredictable proportions."

    Rands informed that president Barack Obama from the United States asked president Lula to talk to Ahmadinejad. "Obviously, both Brazil as Iran, because of the oil, are large economies and need to dialogue."

    The professor of International Relations Gunther Rudzit aknowledges that, by receiving the president of Iran, Brazil can take on an important role as international mediator. But he stresses that the situation involves risks.

    "If president Ahmadinejad is here in Brazil and gives one of those very controversial declarations of his, that can completely jeopardize this outlook. If the country wishes to have a decisive position in the international system, a power to be respected and consulted, it is going to have to run these risks."

    Rudzit says he hopes the preliminary consultations for the visit were well conducted, "exactly to not complicate our position in a so-delicate moment when the world is facing the Iranian nuclear program".

    Also for professor Rudzit, an eventual increase in commercial relations with Iran or getting closer to the Iranian nuclezr policy is not worth the risk of being slapped with economic sanctions by the rich countries. He also emphasizes that the government should be ready for new protests against the Iranian president, which certainly will occur during his Brazilian trip.

    The Iranian leader is expected to sign in Brazil 23 bilateral agreements involving energy, petrochemicals, food and medications among other sectors.

    Alexandre Pôrto works for Rádio Câmara.

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    • Show Comments (8)

    • sage

      joao
      yes i agree 2010 is crucial for brasil in many respects. if anything, imho it w/b a watershead.

      hear you loud & clear on the ‘smooth operator’. however, i am confident, brasilian industry
      leaders will hold their own & drive quite a few hard bargains in the process. brazil has many
      things of a non-military nature that iran needs (russia/china currently take care of their
      military needs)

      re. our political leaders – like all political leaders, should 1 say more………

      finally, we hope that the culture of education strengthens significantly over the
      next generation in brasil. in my observation certain ethnic groups in brasil do show
      a strong affinity for the value of education (german, nippo, syrian, lebanese, etc.)
      i find it interesting that brasil is 1 of kumon’s biggest markets – http://www.kumon.com.br
      worldwide.

    • João da Silva

      sage
      [quote]you made some interesting comments. [/quote]

      So have you! Though I addressed my previous comments to our brilliant fellow blogger DnB with the sole objective of differentiating between tade and religion, I am glad you came to subsidize with more info.

      [quote]in my experience, the body politic of iranian society fundamentally secular &
      given to a middle class orientation. it is more ideally suited to a social democracy
      (like brasil) than a theocracy.[/quote]

      From what I have read and talked with people who have been to that part of that world, even Iraq [i][b]was [/b][/i]like Iran until 2003, with Saddam Hussein in firm command spending money on education, health and other welfare projects. I am not sure how Iran was under the command of the Shah, but in spite of its being ostracized by the Anglo-American empire, Iran managed to survive. It is interesting to observe how much emphasis the Easterners place on education regardless of their religious beliefs. This does indeed creates a strong middle class which does not reject the religion, but certainly does not want to be ruled by the clergymen.

      [quote]imho, mr. a, or dr. a. is a master of theatrics & a shrewd operator. scratch the
      surface & i bet he’s more pragmatic vs. being the religious zealot he’s made out
      to be. at a personal level, the man is not corrupt & lives simply, something you
      cannot say for most of his peers blasting him. [/quote]

      It is obvious for anyone that listens to his speeches. You can not say that for Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan or Al-Maliki of Iraq!!

      [quote]today iran’s trade patterns reflect strong relationships with germany, france, italy, china, malaysia, japan, etc.
      there’s no reason brasil should not be part of this commercial mix. [/quote]

      If these countries are trading with Iran and at the same time maintaining a friendly relationship with the U.S and U.K., why shouldn’t Brasil do it? A good question. I am sure the Ayothullahs are [b][i]not[/i][/b] going to object. Only thing I hope is that our negotiators tread carefully while dealing with the “Shrewd Persian Operators” and not blow up good business opportunities. Also, I sincerely hope that our political leaders do not use his visit [i][b]just[/b][/i] to enhance their own images to get reelected next year and shelve any concrete proposals to increase bilateral trade between the two countries after they accomplish their selfish goals. Lets not forget that the year 2010 is crucial for Brasil for many reasons.

    • sage

      joao
      you made some interesting comments.

      in my experience, the body politic of iranian society fundamentally secular &
      given to a middle class orientation. it is more ideally suited to a social democracy
      (like brasil) than a theocracy.

      imho, mr. a, or dr. a. is a master of theatrics & a shrewd operator. scratch the
      surface & i bet he’s more pragmatic vs. being the religious zealot he’s made out
      to be. at a personal level, the man is not corrupt & lives simply, something you
      cannot say for most of his peers blasting him.

      the revolution has evolved beyond it’s initial theocratic phase, it is attempting to gravitate
      to the next phase & mr. a along w/ others are major players in this process. re.
      mr. m. the recent oposition leader – 1 has to ask the question – when does political
      dissent/protest cross the fine line into becoming a law & order situation, where the state
      has to then step in & restore equilibrium.

      the harsh pressures that iran has been subjected to by the north atlantic imperialist powers
      for the specious reasons we all know about, are actually hurting iran’s evolution into a social
      democracy.

      given, iran’s history, it’s 2 nemeses are russia (w/ who it now has a relationship of convenience)
      & anglo-american zionist imperialism (against which it stands firmly opposed). today iran’s trade
      patterns reflect strong relationships with germany, france, italy, china, malaysia, japan, etc.
      there’s no reason brasil should not be part of this commercial mix.

    • João da Silva

      dnbaiacu
      [quote]Amhadinejad is a leader of a muslim country,,,,,BUT whose side is he REALLY on?…..as he continues business agreements with Brazil , a Catholic country.????
      But maybe he could care less. All about the money. [/quote]

      DnB, I know you like serious discussions and you have in depth knowledge of all the religions. So I think you would understand what I try to say. What difference does it make if he is the leader of a Muslim country or a Buddhist one? The entire Middle East (as well as the East)including Iran was controlled by the Brits until after the WW2. Then the American influence started increasing. Specifically talking about Iran, Shah Reza Pallavi was installed as a puppet by the Anglo-American empire, right? Until 1979, Iran always sided with the West and after the “Islamic revolution”, the country was totally isolated and they even could not buy spare parts for the U.S. made aircraft. Not that I am praising the Ayatollahs, because they were no different from the Shah in oppressing their own people.

      I was reading an article in one of the American websites the other day about how the Iranians are sick and tired of the Ayotullhas and from what I understand this gentleman Ahmadinejad is an alternative solution to go back being secular (They are Persians and not Arabs, you must know that). So if the Americans are doing “CÀƒº doce”, tough luck. We are not going to do any such thing. We can supply many products and trained professionals like airline pilots. So I think that the question of the leader of a “Muslim” country dealing with a “Catholic” country does not arise.

      [quote]But Brazil has to know this will neutralize religion in Brazil..[/quote]

      What religion, lad? CandomblÀƒ©? You being a half Brasilian should know that we are not too religious and “Catholicism” is dying here as well as the rest of Latin America. The vacuum is being filled by the canned churches and I for one have no patience for them.

      [quote]All these “elites” the globe over know what time it is. Or do they?…..It is interesting trying to figure it out. IF it can be figured out.[/quote]

      Yes, the “elites” know no religion, frontier, color, etc; But I am afraid that they are going to meet their proverbial ” Waterloo” if they keep on treating the Muslims as sub humans. Should pay more attention to Dr.CataÀ‚´s comments. 😉

      BTW, I managed to see 2012. Quite boring. Will comment later. 🙂

    • João da Silva

      [quote]what is rodrigo’s problem & who’s paying him off…. [/quote]

      His problem is that he is at the tail end of the line of money chasers and looking for a new “cause” to protest against . Nobody is paying him yet. May be we should extend an invitation to Col.Khadafi to come down and visit us. A fresh “cause” and an alternative target:D

    • dnbaiacu

      This is beyond interesting…
      [quote]The Iranian leader is expected to sign in Brazil 23 bilateral agreements involving energy, petrochemicals, food and medications among other sectors. [/quote]

      It’s hard to tell who really stands for what.
      The Church is part of the plan to neutralize religion. They support the U.N.
      Amhadinejad is a leader of a muslim country,,,,,BUT whose side is he REALLY on?…..as he continues business agreements with Brazil , a Catholic country.????
      But maybe he could care less. All about the money.
      But Brazil has to know this will neutralize religion in Brazil.. ( the people don’t know,, and most could careless anyway)
      All these “elites” the globe over know what time it is. Or do they?…..It is interesting trying to figure it out. IF it can be figured out.

      [quote]FOLLOW THE MONEY” is a motto to be remembered. Better still modify the motto to “CHASE THE MONEY”.[/quote]

      Indeed! The movers and shakers aren’t making these deals in vain. 😉

    • sage

      rodrigo
      joao, you’re the man 8)

      what is rodrigo’s problem & who’s paying him off….

      he could be doing more constructive things w/ his time addressing brasil’s challenges & problems.

      i hope the zionist cancer does not infect & consume o terra da santa cruz!

    • João da Silva

      [quote]The presidents of the Lower House, Michel Temer and of the Senate, JosÀƒ© Sarney, will welcome the Iranian leader at 3:45 pm in the Senate’s Noble Hall, in Brazilian capital BrasÀƒ­lia.[/quote]

      It is absolutely heartening to observe that these two leaders are ready to display the traditional Brasilian hospitality by heartily welcoming the Iranian leader in the Noble Hall of our Senate. A large majority of Brasilians supports their decision.

      [quote]House representative Rodrigo Rocha Loures, from the PMDB, a party allied to the Lula administration, vows to request the Chamber to deny Ahnadinejad entrance to the floor.[/quote]

      RodrigoÀ‚´s request will certainly be denied by his boss Mr.Temer. If he still insists, the Senate security guards can easily handle him. Fortunately, he is not an elected rep from our state. If he is, the next year, we will not vote to re-elect him.

      [quote]”It is natural that there are tensions, most especially with our brothers from the Jewish community, who feel attacked by Ahmadinejad.[/quote]

      None of my brothers from the Jewish community expressed any resentment towards Ahmadinejad. So Mauricio Rands is just exaggerating the supposed “tensions”, but…but…but… after all he is a politician and it is a good opportunity to project his image as a “Great Conciliator”.

      [quote]The Iranian leader is expected to sign in Brazil 23 bilateral agreements involving energy, petrochemicals, food and medications among other sectors. [/quote]

      “FOLLOW THE MONEY” is a motto to be remembered. Better still modify the motto to “CHASE THE MONEY”. 😉 😀 😉

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