US Military Base in Colombia? I Don’t Like It, Says Lula of Brazil

    Brazilian president Lula

    Brazilian president Lula
    US plans to increase the number of troops in Colombia is drawing opposition, not just from left-wing populist leaders in the region but also from moderate governments like Brazil's Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva prompting Colombian President Alvaro Uribe to tour the region to try to ease concerns.

    Colombia, Washington's main ally in the region, says the deal with Washington is aimed at strengthening anti-drug efforts.

    The United States is in talks with Uribe's government about relocating US drug interdiction flight operations to Colombia after being kicked out of neighboring Ecuador. Colombia expects to sign a deal this month after a final round of talks in Washington.

    The plan is expected to increase the number of US troops in Colombia above the current total of less than 300 but not above 800, the maximum permitted under an existing military pact, officials said.

    Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez and allies from Ecuador, Bolivia and Nicaragua accuse the US of setting up a military platform in Colombia from which to "attack" its neighbors.

    But other countries also expressed concern, mainly Brazil and Chile which are seen as serious referents from the region.

    "I don't like the idea of a US base in the region," said Brazilian President Lula da Silva.

    Uribe will meet with Lula, Chile's Michelle Bachelet and other South American leaders starting on Tuesday.

    Bachelet called the Colombia-US talks "disquieting" and said the proposal should be discussed at the August 10 meeting of the South American Unasur group of nations.

    The meeting will be held in Ecuador, which has broken off diplomatic relations with Colombia over a 2008 bombing raid targeting Colombian rebels who were camped out on Ecuador's side of the border.

    "Where was the hysteria when these operations were being run out of Ecuador?" said a high-level official in Colombia's Defense ministry who asked that his name not be used.

    "Mexico is having the worst security crisis in its history due to the drug trade and people are saying we should not help them by doing interdiction operations. It's ridiculous," the official said.

    Mercopress

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    • Show Comments (20)

    • FORREST ALLEN BROWN

      its a done deal states rights
      if lula and chaves does not like the US in there yard than it went next door to play in the sand .

      for 100 years the US was in panamaw it was very stable little farc was north , the US used the darian jungle to play war games .
      after the US pulled out of there look who went nuts and is in jail now , same a the phillipenes got use to the US stability and when the US pulled out look what happend .

      look to PR the US navy left out and now PR has lost millions of dallors and stability ,

      the US is just looking for a place to protect the canal zone as PR was for 100 years and panamaw was.

      and if the FARC and there backers dont like the fact that the US can now respond in munits instead of days well just maybe they will slow down there campain of terror on coulmbias

      as far as US agression all most of you have ever seen is the slanted news reports from your state run machines .

    • Greenspan

      Your Jakobs…
      [quote]Well, the problem is, US is bankrupt[/quote]

      Now, now. Don’t fret. When one has a GDP of 15 TRILLION a year, a trillion here or there isn’t too hard to make up. If you recall, Bill Clinton inherited an enormous debt and was able to turn it into a surplus in a very short period of time, relatively speaking.

      Now, concerning Brazil’s “surplus”, keep this in mind.

      [quote]The government can have a surplus even if it has trillions in debt, but it cannot have a surplus if that debt increased every year.[/quote]

      Brazil always screaming about their “surplus” doesn’t mean jack-diddely, and certainly doesn’t mean that they’re not in debt, especially when state-owned petrobras is borrowing money from the chinese as well as americans.

    • jakob

      Dummkopf
      [quote]Well of couse it would Jacob, don’t ya think that just may be in line with the U.S. strategy? [/quote]

      Well, the problem is, US is bankrupt. The Fed is printing dollars as if there is no tomorrow. This base in Colombia will the financed, therefore, by phantom capital. When you are in a deep hole, the first step should be to stop digging.

      [quote]Let’s see if Hugo is prepared to keep up his illegal activities and back up his big mouth when he’s face to face with the most deadly military force in the history of mankind.[/quote]

      Fucking stupid teenagers on a power trip. This board is full of them.

    • João da Silva

      [quote]I hear…
      written by Dr. Mengele, August 06, 2009
      Zoloft is good for that Diego![/quote]

      It is so good to hear from you Joe. Is it the “final solution” you are proposing for Diego?

      Hope you are comfortable in your tomb and keeping yourself warm.

    • Dr. Mengele

      I hear…
      Zoloft is good for that Diego!!

    • asp

      oh yeah, diego, just let farc come in and fuck you in the ass…
      stop with the fucking cold war brain washing you have in your head…and no one fucks you more in the ass than the corrupt mother fuckers in your own country..how does it feel to have your rectum stretched to the limit by these people while you are crying like a baby at what the usa does ?

      fuck farc, hugo chavez and all his dumb ass followers

    • Diego

      F***** americans, yall thing you can come to South America and do whatever yall cowboys want? Get the fuck out of here and get lost, maybe in one of the countries yall invaded, tortured and killed innocent people. Dont come here and do your dirty business imperialists motherf****

    • Schwartzkopf

      [quote]the dumbest thing you did was to spell the name of the “strong man” of Libya incorrectly.It is “MOHAMAR GHADAFFI”.[/quote]

      Give an ole, retired general a break JoÀƒ£o. We wake up before the birds here and once 8 pm rolls around it’s a little too late to be spell checking!! 😀

      [quote]Hey you Dummkopf smilies/grin.gif, ever hear about “projection of power”? Even if Colombia is a sovereign nation, a US base there would project US influence way beyond Colombia. [/quote]

      Well of couse it would Jacob, don’t ya think that just may be in line with the U.S. strategy? Let’s see if Hugo is prepared to keep up his illegal activities and back up his big mouth when he’s face to face with the most deadly military force in the history of mankind.

      [quote]Ironically, you are right – it is not about Brazil, it is all about US Americans “redirecting” and “managing” cocaine sale income, just like they did with heroin in Afghanistan.[/quote]

      Better be careful with statements like that…..you may find that you just might lose your “jacobs”! 😀

    • jakob

      Hey Schwartzkopf
      [quote]is it’s own country and if I’m not mistaken, can do what the f**k they want! Why doesn’t brazil and all the other left-wing socialist/communist countries in S.A. just mind their own frickin’ business?
      [/quote]

      Hey you Dummkopf ;-), ever hear about “projection of power”? Even if Colombia is a sovereign nation, a US base there would project US influence way beyond Colombia.

      [quote]This isn’t about YOU Brazil. It’s about the FARC and cocaine. [/quote]

      Ironically, you are right – it is not about Brazil, it is all about US Americans “redirecting” and “managing” cocaine sale income, just like they did with heroin in Afghanistan. 😉

    • João da Silva

      Schwartzkopf
      I didn’t really expect to address a humble person like me about this issue, Norman. I am honored though ( ;-))

      to answer your comment:

      [quote]Maybe Never…but Venezuela? [/quote]

      I doubt if Hugh will do it. He is full of hot air, as you might have already discovered.

      [quote]I’d bet he’d be asking for several to be opened up in Brazil with their headquarters in Brasilia! [/quote]

      You already lost your bet and for “security reasons!, I aint going to explain to ya. Even if I do, you are going to come back with your endless arguments ( 😀 ).

      [quote]Hilarious how everyone pretends that Chavez and Morales aren’t directly supporting the FARC. Those drug-pushing, communist bastards need a “Momar Kadaffi”![/quote]

      Norman, you try to pass for an ignorant hilly-billy from Arkansas and [b][i]even I [/i][/b]can make out that you are not all that dumb. BUT….BUT…., the dumbest thing you did was to spell the name of the [i][b]”strong man” [/b][/i] of Libya incorrectly.It is [b][i]”MOHAMAR GHADAFFI”[/i][/b]. In case you have any doubt about it, you better ask our agent in Geneve!!!!!

    • asp

      farc is already raping brazil…
      and every one acts like it isnt happening…tarso genro said brazil doesnt have a problem with the farc…no one wants to admit that farc is contributing to the decay of its biggest cities…

      just recent news aludes to the fact that rockte launchers bought from the swizz by venezuela were found in farc hands. and the swizz are holding chavez accountable…

      correa, morales and chavez are using the farc to get money from the drug trade…they have a real nice thing going for them…

    • Schwartzkopf

      [quote]written by JoÀƒ£o da Silva, August 05, 2009

      If Brazil was invaded, by, say, Argentina,

      When is that going to happen? [/quote]

      Maybe Never…but Venezuela?

      If Columbia allows the U.S. to put 25,000 troops on the ground that’s exactly what they should do. They’ll push the FARC right into good, ole Brazil and then let’s see what Lula has to say about american military bases in S.A.

      I’d bet he’d be asking for several to be opened up in Brazil with their headquarters in Brasilia!

      Hilarious how everyone pretends that Chavez and Morales aren’t directly supporting the FARC. Those drug-pushing, communist bastards need a “Momar Kadaffi”! 😉

    • João da Silva

      [quote]If Brazil was invaded, by, say, Argentina,[/quote]

      When is that going to happen?

    • Johnny Cash

      American Agression
      Yes. The USA has a long history of invading and oppressing innocent people. Look at all of Europe, Kuwait, the middle east in general, Japan. All the places the US sent their blood to liberate people. All free countries now, and for the last century. You Che-wannabe revolutionaries sleep safely at night because the US exists.

      If Brazil was invaded, by, say, Argentina, and all of Lula’s new tanks were stuck in the mud, that nine-fingered idiot would be dialing the White House for help. BUT, since Bush is gone, Lula probably wouldn’t get help from Obama. That would be time to start learning Spanish for the Brasilians.

    • João da Silva

      Titanium
      [quote]Another case of American agression. [/quote]

      It goes without saying and I am glad that you clearly perceived the “obvious” that many are unable to. People like Mr.Brown, Mr.Severus, ASP, ch.c, etc; are unwilling to accept this sad reality. BUT…BUT…, I am sure that the new Administration in Washington D.C will change this policy and withdraw the U.S. personnel from their base in Colombia and outsource the management of the same to FARC.

    • titan

      .
      Another case of American agression.

    • João da Silva

      asp
      [quote]i like lula, i like things he has done for brazil, but, this kind of thinking has a reeking smell of hypocracy[/quote]

      Relax, Brother. He knows what he is doing and there is no hypocrisy involved in it.

    • asp

      yeah, really interesting no one ranks on farc outside of columbia…
      farc is just raping brazil, doing big business of arms and drugs with the huge gangs of fernando beira mar in rio ( even jail, two of his leutenints were busted with farc not long ago ) and the pcc in sao paulo. ive seen two reports of farc kidnaps off brazilian borders of young brazilian men to have to work for farc.

      while not being the only ones involved with this, for sure, rougue elements in the paraguaen army has its fingers in it,farc is sure one of the factors contributing to the decline and decent into a hell violence existance of the biggest cities in brazil.of course there is personal responsibility involved and how all sides in these cities have allowed this to happen

      its also a proven fact that chaves and correa support farc. what kind of hypocracy is this ?

      are people in south america so brainwashed about the cold war that they cant see what is really happening ? the oas is supporting and celibrating the brutal cuban dictatorship and trying to distance themselves from the usa.

      they just cant look at the cold war and see everyone was dirty. che guevera and fidel with the soviet union were just as imperialistic as the usa was. and they were invited by both sides of the dirty little wars going on in south america, africa and south east asia.everyone is dirty.

      yet, now, especialy in south america, the usa are the new “nazis”. they dont want to look at their own history of battles with the comunists in the 30’s, with torture and uprisings going on then, this was no new thing brought on by the usa.the usa didnt send troops to south america, they did send cia and had tacit support of the dictatorships, which have all ended and now are democracies…..except cuba

      there were brutal killings and torture in south america, in the cold war ,and, democraticly elected officials were over thrown.but, in comparison to world war two, and the amount of people killed and the realisations that you really do have to be vigalent and engaged in the world,these things seem like a drop in the bucket in comparison….according to various sources ive read, under 1000 people from the oposition were killed in brazils cold war dictatorship. how does that stack up to 20,000,000 eliminatied in the soviet union under the name of comunism ? or 60,000 executed in cuba ?

      i like lula, i like things he has done for brazil, but, this kind of thinking has a reeking smell of hypocracy .but , that is the dynamic in south america now, i hope these things dont come back and bite people in the ass , like americas cold war policies are coming back and biting it in the ass now

    • FORREST ALLEN BROWN

      Schwartzkopf,
      Just maybe its because it will hurt there drug business .
      if there people cant get cheep drugs just maybe they will wake up to see how they were getting screwd all thies years.

      Or chavas has his hand up his pupets ass pulling his strings.

      you are right coulmbia has its right to invite whom ever they want into there country .

      food for thought let all the South American countries pull out all the illeagles living in the US
      and just maybe the US would not have to try to help stop the drug troops ,FARC helped by chaves and help from Ecuador

    • Schwartzkopf

      Columbia…
      is it’s own country and if I’m not mistaken, can do what the fuck they want! Why doesn’t brazil and all the other left-wing socialist/communist countries in S.A. just mind their own frickin’ business?

      This isn’t about YOU Brazil. It’s about the FARC and cocaine.

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