Leaked Court Papers Show 52 Politics Linked to Corruption in Brazil: It Starts with the President

Leading the list are Brazilian President Michel Temer, former soccer star Romário, former candidate to the presidency, Aécio Neves, and the heads of the Senate and the Lower House.

The president of Brazil’s federal Supreme Court, Carmen Lucia, approved Monday plea bargain statements of 77 executives and former employees of Odebrecht, Brazil’s largest construction conglomerate.

The testimonies implicate dozens of politicians in the country’s central corruption scandal involving bribery and fraud in the country’s state-run oil company, Petrobras.

Although the full roster of who has been implicated in the testimonies that the Supreme Court just approved remains unknown, a leak of statements from one Odebrecht executive — released by Brazil’s Globo newspaper in December — sheds light on the allegations against 52 figures embroiled in the scandal, including President Michel Temer and several of his top allies.

The leaked statement by former Odebrecht officer Claudio Melo Filho reveals that the construction company had paid millions to several politicians, including Temer.

Other notable figures on the list include Eduardo Cunha, the former head of the lower house of Congress and chief architect of the impeachment bid — widely condemned as a parliamentary coup — against former President Dilma Rousseff; Romero Jucá, head of Temer’s PMDB party and interim planning minister in his administration before he was forced to step down over corruption allegations; Renan Calheiros, head of the Senate; Aécio Neves, a senator who lost the presidential race to Rousseff in 2014; and others.

All politicians deny any wrongdoing.

Here is the list of 52 figures exposed in Claudio Melo Filho’s testimony.

Michel Temer (President of Brazil, PMDB)

Melo says Temer asked Odebrecht for US$ 3,000 to support his party. Part of the payment was allegedly made to Jose Ynes, friend of Temer and current adviser to the president. The president said he denies these “false accusations.”

Aécio Neves (senator, PSDB)

Melo’s son alleged that Neves would receive US$ 300,000 from Marcelo Odebrecht, head of the construction company, through Senator Jose Agripino. The amount, he confessed, was requested by Aécio Neves to Odebrecht, “as a way to support the Democrat party,” which at that time was chaired by Agripino.

Eduardo Cunha (former lawmaker, PMDB)

Cunha received donations because of its political importance. Melo said he had dealt directly with Cunha regarding the payments.

Eliseu Padilha (minister, PMDB)

Melo said he had dined with Temer, Padilha and Marcelo Odebrecht and Padilha would have requested financial support from Odebrecht for PMDB campaigns. Odebrecht would have agreed to pay US$ 3 million.

Eunício Oliveira (Senator, PMDB)

Melo said that the senator would have received US$ 600,000 for a vote in favor of a project favorable to Odebrecht.

Renan Calheiros (senator and President of the Senate, PMDB)

He benefited from payments made to Romero Jucá of US$ 7,000 million.

Romero Jucá (senator, PMDB)

Jucá received US$ 6 million to favor Odebrecht in at least 12 legislative matters. Although the senator denied these allegations, the informant maintains that Jucá’s son also received part of this donation.

Below is the full list of 52 politicians implicated in the scandal:

Adolfo Viana (lawmaker, PSDB)

Melo accused Viana of receiving about US$ 1,000 under the pretext of paying for a political campaign, requested by lawmaker Jutahy Magellan. Viana claims he doesn’t know Melo.

Aécio Neves (senator, PSDB)

Melo’s son denounced, that by Marcelo Odebrecht, head of the construction company, he would receive US$ 300,000 by Senator Jose Agripino. The amount, he confessed, was requested by Aécio Neves to Odebrecht, “as a way to support the Democrat party which at that time was chaired by Agripino.

Anderson Dornelles (former advisor to president Dilma Rousseff, PT)

Melo’s son accused him of receiving US$100,000 and allegedly requested financial support from Odebrecht during a meeting. Dornelles denied the charges, saying he never had a meeting at Odebrecht’s headquarters and never asked for financial support.

Antônio Brito (federal lawmaker, PSD)

Melo’s son said Brito had a close relationship with Petrobras and his father was an Odebrecht lawyer. During the campaign in 2010, Melo said he approved, by Brito’s request US$30,000 for financial assistance to the candidates of his political bloc. He also asked, and received, US$60,000, under the pretext of the campaign. In 2014, the company made a single donation to Brito’s campaign for US$40,000.

Antônio Imbassahy (federal lawmaker, PSDB)

Melo said that the lawmaker US$ 100,000 as financial assistance for his 2014 campaign.

Antônio Palocci (former minister, PT)

Melo’s son explained that his role was limited to request the support of Senator Romero Jucá.

Arthur Maia (federal lawmaker, PPS)

Melo acknowledged that he received a request for financial assistance from Maia, who diverted about US$ 80,000.

Artur Virgílio Neto (Manaus mayor, PSDB)

Melo said that he made a campaign contribution of US$ 100,000.

Benito Gama (federal lawmaker, PTB)

A payment of US$ 10,000 was made to the lawmaker on the condition that if he won the 2014 elections, in the future he would protect the interests of the company in Congress. Gama acknowledged the payment but said it was declared.

Bruno Araújo (Cities Minister, PSDB)

Melo said he only had an institutional relationship with the current minister. He did not refer to any payment.

Carlinhos Almeida (former mayor of San Jose dos Campos, PT)

The former lawmaker had asked for financial aid for his campaign when he ran for mayor. Melo denounced that the politician asked Odebrecht US$ 15,000.

Ciro Nogueira (senator, PP)

Melo denounced that Nogueira requested money, and payments were made for US$100,000 and US$500,000. He also mentioned a legal donation to US$ 150,000 to the senator’s wife.

Claudio Cajado (federal lawmaker, DEM)

According to the statements, a payment was made for US$ 100,000 with the condition if he won in the elections he would protecting the interests of the company.

Colbert Martins (deputy mayor of Feira de Santana, PMDB)

Melo stated that Martins received a collaboration for US$ 180,000 at the request of Geddel Vieira Lima and was expected to protect the company’s interests. The deputy mayor denied receiving undeclared money from Odebrecht or any other company.

Daniel Almeida (federal lawmaker, PC do B)

Melo denounced that Almeida received US$ 30.000.

Delcídio do Amaral (former senator)

Delcídio received US$ 150,000. He defended himself by saying that the information is speculative, unofficial and without credibility.

Duarte Nogueira (prefect of Ribeirão Preto)

He would have been paid US$ 100,000.

Eduardo Cunha (former lawmaker, PMDB)

Cunha received donations because of its political importance. Melo said he had dealt directly with Cunha regarding the payments.

Eliseu Padilha (minister, PMDB)

Melo said he had dined with Temer, Padilha and Marcelo Odebrecht and Padilha would have requested financial support from Odebrecht for PMDB campaigns. Odebrecht would have agreed to pay US$ 3 million.

Eunício Oliveira (Senator, PMDB)

Melo said that the senator would have received US$ 600,000 for a vote in favor of a project favorable to Odebrecht.

Francisco Dornelles (Deputy governor of Rio de Janeiro, PP)

He received US$ 60,000 for his position, to vote in favor of infrastructure bills favorable to the interests of the company.

Geddel Vieira Lima (former minister, PMDB)

He received a watch valued at US$ 25,000 by Odebrecht, and for its activity in favor of the company in the Lower House about US$ 1.5 million.

Gilberto Kassab (Minister of Science and Technology, PSD)

Melo said that he did not participate in any encounter with him, and Kassab recommended caution with the claims.

Gim Argello (former senator, PTB)

He asked for money for his campaigns and he received US$ 800,000 in exchange of legislative acts favorable to Odebrecht.

Guido Mantega (former minister, PT)

Odebrecht was meeting with Mantega to discuss a project, but that the government wanted Romero Jucá to be involved.

Heráclito Fortes (federal lawmaker, PSB)

He received US$ 80,000 so that “in case of necessity we can use his support in the Senate,” said Melo.

Hugo Napoleão (former senator, PSD)

Received US$95,000 during his campaign based on the premise that the candidate, if chosen, would favor Odebrecht’s interests.

Inaldo Leitão (former lawmaker and president of the Mail Administration Council)

Leitão received a payment of US$ 30,000.

Jaques Wagner (former governor of Bahia and former minister, PT)

Wagner received US$ 479,000 and also received two watches.

João Almeida (former lawmaker, PSDB)

Almeida was an official in Odebrecht and maintained ties with the company even after his entry into politics. Under the pretext of campaign donations received US$ 160,000.

José Agripino (Senator, DEM)

The senator received US$ 300,000 at the request of Marcelo Odebrecht in 2014 quested by Aécio Neves.

José Carlos Aleluia (federal lawmaker, DEM)

Aleluia received donations for US$ 170,000.

Jutahy Magalhães Jr ( federal lawmaker, PSDB)

Historically linked to Odebrecht. He would have received US$270,000 according to Melo to defend the interests of the company in the state of Bahia.

Kátia Abreu (senator, PMDB)

She approached Odebrecht to receive funding, which was only granted when she became Minister of Agriculture. The figure she received is unknown.

Leur Lomanto Jr (state lawmaker, PMDB)

Odebrecht made a donation for US$ 80,000.

Lídice da Mata (senator, PSB)

The former mayor of Salvador has a historical relationship with Odebrecht, although she denied it. In total she received US$ 60,000 as a donation for the campaign.

Lúcio Vieira Lima (congressman, PMDB)

Lima received about US$ 500,00 for being the chairman of the Joint Commission of a provisional measure in Congress and for being the deputy leader of his party in the Lower House. But it was the congressman himself who asked for financial help from the company.

Marco Maia (congressman, PT)

Maia asked for contributions that were authorized by Marcelo Odebrecht and made through a “system of structured transactions,” for US$ 430,000.

Michel Temer (President of Brazil, PMDB)

Melo says Temer asked Odebrecht for US$ 3,000 to support his party. Also part of the payment was made to Jose Ynes, friend of Temer and today adviser of the presidency. The president said he denies these “false accusations.”

Moreira Franco (Secretary for Investment Programs, PMDB)

Franco asked for economic support to his party in the elections, before being minister.

Orlando Silva (congressman, BPC)

Silva approached Odebrecht’s offices and asked for donations, in expectation that he would act according to the interests of the company, for US$ 30,000.

Paulo Henrique Lustosa (former congressman, PP)

Received US$ 63,000 based on the expectation that after winning he would protect the interests of the company.

Paulo Magalhães Júnior (councilman in Salvador, PV)

Odebrecht contributed to its campaign with US$15,000, due to a personal relationship with Melo.

Paes Landim (congressman, PTB)

Always had a good relationship with Odebrecht, and named the company in several speeches. In total, US$ 57,000 were received in the form of donations to protect the company’s interests.

Paulo Skaff (businessman and president of the Industry Federation in Sao Paulo, PMDB)

Skaff received US$ 1,000 from a total of US$ 3,000 that Michel Temer asked Odebrecht.

Renan Calheiros (senator and President of the Senate, PMDB)

He benefited from payments made to Romero Jucá of US$ 7,000 million.

Renan Calheiros (son) (governor of Alagoas, PMDB)

Calheiros received US$ 500,000 after his father’s request. The governor insisted that the donations were legal.

Robério Negreiros (lawmaker and president of the Security Commission, PSDB)

Negreiros received a donation of US$15,000 for his campaign at the request of his father, Luiz Carlos Garcia, who had a good relationship with Melo.

Rodrigo Maia (Congressman and President of the Lower House, DEM)

Maia received US$ 30,000 during the campaign for mayor in 2012, in exchange for a favorable vote on a provisional measure which were approved.

Romário (senator, PSB)

Romário met with Eduardo Martins, director of Odebrecht. After the meeting, Martins asked the company to make a contribution with the former footballer’s campaign. Leandro Azevedo, the top executive of Odebrecht, refused to make a donation after Romário’s criticism of the construction of stadiums for the World Cup. Finally, the transaction was not carried out.

Romero Jucá (senator, PMDB)

Jucá received US$ 6 million to favor Odebrecht in at least 12 legislative matters. Although the senator denied these allegations, the informant maintains that Jucá’s son also received part of this donation.

Rui Costa (governor of Bahia, PT)

Costa received donations during the campaign derived from a request from former minister Jaques Wagner, following a conflict with the state-owned Bahia Gás.

teleSUR

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