Brazil Seeks International Pacts to Fight Corruption

By the end of 2006, the Brazilian government intends to negotiate and sign judicial cooperation agreements with 50 countries that offer the greatest potential for exchanges, as well as those known as tax havens.

Judicial cooperation agreements on penal matters currently exist with nine countries: Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Colombia, the United States, France, Italy, Peru, and Portugal.

The Asset Recovery and International Judicial Cooperation Department, which was created last year and is subordinated to the National Secretariat of Justice in the Ministry of Justice, is the organ responsible for promoting these agreements.


The next agreement to be signed, by the end of this year, is with the United Kingdom. Agreements are also being negotiated with South Africa, Germany, Australia, the Bahamas, Spain, Hong Kong, Hungary, Jersey, the Cayman Islands, Israel, Liechtenstein, Poland, and the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal, San Tome and Principe, and East Timor).

Among treaties that have already been signed, those with South Korea, Lebanon, Ukrania, and all the member countries of the Organization of American States await Congressional approval.


Treaties also have been signed with Switzerland, Cuba, and China but have not yet been submitted to the Congress.


“The Ministry of Justice has been working harder and harder to conclude agreements, in order to obtain evidence in other countries and to be able more quickly to block assets, acquire information, and recover such assets in the future,” explained the National Secretary of Justice, Cláudia Chagas.

The signing of these agreements represents one of the principal goals of the Brazilian government, as defined in the National Strategy to Combat Money-Laundering (Encla), launched at the end of 2003.


According to Chagas, the objective is to give the State greater efficiency and agility in the war on money-laundering.


“There is still no judicial globalization compatible with the globalization of crime, so that is what we are trying to construct: creating ways to increase the number of investigations and increase the number of convictions and, on the other hand, work on prevention,” she pointed out.

Agência Brasil
Reporter: Juliana Andrade
Translator: David Silberstein

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil Uses Soccer Imagery to Vaccinate 16 Million Against Polio

Consolidated data from the first phase of Brazil’s National Vaccination Campaign Against Child Paralysis, ...

The Amazon

Brazil’s Asymmetrical Challenges & the World’s Covetous Eyes on the Amazon

There are three types of people, a saying goes: those who make things happen, ...

UK Firm to Help Brazil Develop Polymer OLED Applications

Cambridge Display Technology (CDT) has struck a deal to sell inkjet printing equipment to ...

Has the Brazilian Judiciary Become a Mafia?

The Brazilian judiciary has historically been so rife with corruption and nepotism that one ...

After Overweight Remark Brazil’s Lula Tries to Make Amends with Striker Ronaldo

Football and politics, politics and football, it’s hard to find the leading thread particularly ...

20/20: 20% of Brazilians Have Diabetes and 20% Have High Cholesterol

According to the Brazilian Society of Cardiology (SBC), diabetes is one of the most ...

Latam’s Main Furniture Fair Opens in Brazil

Thirty foreign buyers from Latin America, Europe and the Middle East are participating in ...

Civil construction in Brazil

Shrinking Lasted Only Three Months. Brazil Is Growing Again

The Brazilian economy grew at its fastest pace in over a year and a ...

Better Credit Rating for Brazil Gives Bulls a Boost

Latin American stocks advanced strongly, with Brazilian shares getting a boost from an upgrade ...