Brazil Strings and Wind Get World Respect

    Brazilian musical instruments have accelerated their rhythm of export. Last year, sector foreign sales doubled and generated over US$ 10 million.

    Apart from the quality, the low cost is one of the main competitive advantages of Brazilian instruments, which cost around two thirds of the price of products made in other countries.

    According to figures supplied by the Brazilian Music Association (Abemúsica), nowadays the sector in the country, which had revenues of US$ 169 million in 2004, in current figures, and generates around 5,000 direct jobs, sells to 40 countries. For 2005, the organization’s estimate is growth of 40% in exports.

    The main destination markets for foreign sales, which started timidly around 15 years ago, are still the United States and Mexico. Arab countries, like the United Arab Emirates, are among the new markets.

    Weril, a maker of wind instruments, had never exported as much as they exported in 2004. Last year foreign sales of saxophones, trombones, tubas and other instruments to the foreign market reached 28% of company revenues, which total around US$ 2.9 million. In 2005, the forecast is for expansion of this percentage to, at least, 35%.

    Based in the city of Franco da Rocha, in greater São Paulo, the largest industrial area in Brazil, Weril generates around 200 direct jobs.

    So as to reach international recognition, in the last two years Weril invested US$ 1.1 million in technology and infrastructure.

    In 2002, in the United States, in a test by blindfolded musicians, the "blind test" promoted by the International Trombone Association of the United States, the G. Gagliardi trombone was elected one of the best in the world.

    "Each country has specific needs, but the strategy is the same for any market: showing that Weril instruments bring together the best cost/benefit relations both for those who resell and for musicians or end users, who purchase at the store," explained the commercial director of Weril, Roberto Weingrill Jr.

    Recognition among some foreign musicians has already started. Two players of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, from New York – Marcus Printup, trumpet, and Vincent Gardner, trombone – started playing exclusively Weril instruments.

    Pioneer

    Giannini, which has been producing string instruments for 104 years, has been exporting for over four decades.

    "Our company is a pioneer in musical instrument exports in Brazil," stated Flávio Giannini, the company marketing director.

    In 2004, company exports grew around 10%. Foreign sales represented 5% of revenues, which are not made public by the company. Oceania is among the new import markets.

    According to the director, so as to reach a target of 20% growth in the medium term, the company invests in participation in fairs like NAMM, in Los Angeles, Frankfurt Messe, in Germany, and in the Brazilian Expomusic.

    Giannini exports to over 20 countries, among them the United States, Canada, Italy, France, Germany, Australia and Iran.

    The main products traded outside the country are guitars, craviolas and ethnic instruments like cavaquinhos (similar to ukeleles) and mandolins.

    Sales are either direct or through representatives in Europe, South America or the United States. The company, located in the city of Salto, in the interior of the state of São Paulo, generates 400 direct jobs.

    Among the Brazilian musicians sponsored by Giannini are João Bosco, Toquinho, Roberto Menescal, Robson Miguel and Ulisses Rocha.

    National Guitars

    There are currently 61 musical instrument factories and 44 audio and equipment factories, makers of speakers and amplifiers. The industry’s revenues reached US$ 133 million, US$ 79.3 million with audio and US$ 53.6 million with musical instruments.

    Contacts

    Abemúsica
    www.abemusica.com.br

    Weril Instrumentos Musicais
    www.weril.com.br

    Giannini
    www.giannini.com.br

    ANBA – Brazil-Arab News Agency

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    Advertisement:

    Music is universal.  The language of guitars and drums is spoken all over the world.  Music is even credited to help ease depression.  If you’ve ever wanted to learn how to play a musical instrument, don’t hesitate. 

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